Harry G. Prince - UC Hastings College of the Law. San Francisco, CA, US

Harry G. Prince Harry G. Prince

Professor of Law | UC Hastings College of the Law

San Francisco, CA, US
Contacts: princeh@uchastings.edu / 415-565-4790 / Office M218-198

Biography

Professor Harry G. (H.G.) Prince completed his undergraduate studies at Temple University in Philadelphia, and received his J.D. from New York University. Professor Prince came to UC Hastings as a visitor in 1985 and joined the regular faculty in 1986. Before coming west, he began teaching at the University of Illinois in 1982 after serving as a law clerk to Judge Lee R. West of the Western District of Oklahoma and working as an attorney-adviser in the U.S. State Department. Professor Prince has also taught as a visitor or lecturer at a number of other law schools, including George Washington University, Howard University, UC Berkeley, and Golden Gate.

Professor Prince is a native of Duncan, Oklahoma, and has three children. He is an avid Chicago Cubs and Bears fan; loves to cook when he has the time; and enjoys jazz music.

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Areas of Expertise (3)

Contracts and Commercial Law Critical Race Theory Public International Law

Education (2)

New York Unviersity: J.D., Law

Temple University: B.A., Undergraduate Studies

Media Appearances (4)

Contract Law Present and Future: A Symposium to Honor Professor Charles L. Knapp on Fifty Years of Teaching Law: Foreword

Hastings Law Journal  online

2015-05-01

The American Association of Law Schools ("AALS") Contracts Section listserv recently carried an online conversation that began with the question of whether anyone knew a case in which the court refused to enforce a contract because of its racial content. A lively and informative discussion ensued. One of the responses cited a case in which the court held that the refusal to contract based on race was wrongful, but the author went on to suggest she believed she had seen a case in an older edition of the Knapp casebook that held that an offer could be restricted on the basis on race. Shortly thereafter Professor Chuck Knapp confirmed that in the first edition of his casebook there had indeed been such a case, Maughs v. Porter, a 1931 Virginia Supreme Court decision. Professor Knapp went on to explain the holding in the case and its appearance, and subsequent disappearance, from the casebook. This brief exchange offers a number of insights about Professor Knapp's stature and enduring contribution to the contract law academy.

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How Can an Association of Law Schools Promote Quality Legal Education?

Journal of Legal Education  online

2001-09-01

The Association of American Law Schools is the voluntary membership organization for U.S. law schools with 162 member schools. It was founded in 1900, with the stated mission of the "the improvement of the legal profession through legal education." At that time the great majority of U.S. lawyers had not been educated in law schools, but rather in lawyer's offices as apprentice. While others either did not take their obligation seriously or simply did not have adequate skills to train their apprentices properly, and even in the best apprentices there was little theoretical training...

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Foreward: A Parallel Community - People of Colour Legal Scholarship Conferences and the Advancement of Legal Education

Third World Law Journal  online

2000-01-01

The First National Meeting of the Regional People of Color Legal Scholarship Conferences presented an opportunity to exchange ideas about legal education and substantive areas of the law. The meeting was also a grand occasion for celebration. Over the last thirty years, the doors to teaching in law schools have been opened wider, and many teachers of color have entered. This increased diversity makes legal education more dynamic and better prepares students to become lawyers who are more responsive to the needs of society. Without need for citation or footnote, I can say very confidently that legal education is better now because of the more diverse professoriate.

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Public Policy Limitations on Cohabitation Agreements: Unruly Horse or Circus Pony?

Minnesota Law Review  online

1985-01-01

Parties generally enter into contracts confident that courts will enforce the agreement against a party who fails to render a promised performance when it becomes due. Without the courts as an avenue for relief in the event of a breach, contracting parties would be extremely vulnerable and perhaps would refrain from bargaining. The maintenance of a judicial process to encourage contracting facilitates efficient commercial and other exchanges in our free-market society...

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Selected Articles (4)

How Can an Association of Law Schools Promote Quality Legal Education?
Journal of Legal Education

2001-01-01

The Association of American Law Schools is the voluntary membership
organization for U.S. law schools, with 162 member schools. It was founded in 1900, with the stated mission of "the improvement of the legal profession through legal education." At that time the great majority of U.S. lawyers had not been educated in law schools, but rather in lawyers' offices as apprentices. While some lawyers devoted serious attention to training their apprentices, others either did not take their obligation seriously or simply did not have adequate skills to train their apprentices properly, and even in the best apprenticeships there was little theoretical training...

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Decanal and Administrative Opportunities in the New Millenium
Widener Law Symposium Journal

2000-01-01

A Panel of four acting or former associate deans was called together to discuss the topic on Sunday, February 13, 2000. This diverse panel included Professor H.G. Prince, Associate Dean Frederic White, Associate Dean Patricia Mell, and Professor Veryl Miles. H.G. Prince is the Depury Director of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) and served as associate dean at Hastings School of Law from 1991 to 1993...

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Foreward: A Parallel Community — People of Color Legal Scholarship Conferences and the Advancement of Legal Education
Boston College Third World Law Journal

2000-01-01

The First National Meeting of the Regional People of Color Legal Scholarship Conferences presented an opportunity to exchange ideas about legal education and substantive areas of the law. The meeting was also a grand occasion for celebration. Over the last thirty years, the doors to teaching in law schools have opened wider, and many teachers of color have entered...

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In Tribute (Professor Stefan A. Risenfeld)
Hastings International and Comparative Law Review

1997-01-01

The Office of the Legal Adviser in the United States Department of State is an ideal place for a young lawyer with an interest in public international law to begin work. I felt very lucky as I began work in that office in the fall of 1981, one year out of law school and fresh from a judicial clerkship. The emphasis upon international law in the Legal Adviser's work makes it different, of course, from more domestic legal practice...

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