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Catherine Yu - Diabetes Canada. Toronto, ON, CA

Catherine Yu

Associate Scientist | Diabetes Canada

Toronto, ON, CANADA

Dr. Catherine Yu is a staff endocrinologist at St Michael's Hospital and an Associate Scientist at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute.

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Biography

Dr. Catherine Yu is a staff endocrinologist at St Michael's Hospital and an Associate Scientist at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute. She is also Chair of the Dissemination and Implementation Committee of Diabetes Canada's Clinical Practice Guidelines.

Dr. Yu's research interests lie in the role of patient and clinician behaviour change in knowledge translation. She is particularly interested in the development of innovative strategies for continuing professional development and patient education in chronic disease management, specifically diabetes care.

Her projects include the role of interactive self-management websites, order sets, computer-based simulators and interprofessional workshops on knowledge, behavior change, clinical and psychological outcomes.

Additional research specialties are endocrinology and medical education.

Industry Expertise (4)

Research Health Care - Providers Health and Wellness Education/Learning

Areas of Expertise (4)

Endocrinology and Metabolism Internal Medicine Patient Self-Management Education Diabetes Care

Education (2)

University of Toronto: MHSc, Public Health Sciences

University of Toronto: BSc, Human Biology

Affiliations (3)

  • St. Michael's Hospital : Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism
  • University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine and Dalla Lana School of Public Health : Assistant Professor
  • Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital : Associate Scientist

Articles (5)

Impact of an interprofessional shared decision-making and goal-setting decision aid for patients with diabetes on decisional conflict - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial Trials.

2015-06-27

Competing health concerns present real obstacles to people living with diabetes and other chronic diseases as well as to their primary care providers. Guideline implementation interventions rarely acknowledge this, leaving both patients and providers feeling overwhelmed by the volume of recommended actions.

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User-centered design of a web-based self-management site for individuals with type 2 diabetes - providing a sense of control and community. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak

2014-07-23

Participants outlined a series of unmet health care needs, and stated that they wanted timely access to tailored knowledge about their condition, mechanisms to control and track their disease, and opportunities to share experiences with other patients. These findings have implications for patients with type 2 diabetes of diverse ages, socioeconomic backgrounds, and disease severity, as well as to the design of other computer-based resources for chronic disease management.

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Designing and evaluating an interprofessional shared decision-making and goal-setting decision aid for patients with diabetes in clinical care--systematic decision aid development and study protocol. Implement Sci

2014-01-22

Interprofessional shared decision-making regarding priority-setting with the use of a decision aid toolkit may help prioritize care of individuals with multiple comorbid conditions. Adhering to principles of user-centered design, we will develop and refine a toolkit to assess the feasibility of this approach.

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Identifying strategies to improve diabetes care in Alberta, Canada, using the knowledge-to-action cycle. CMAJ

2013-11-20

We identified important barriers to achieving optimal outcomes in diabetes that may be overcome through the use of evidence-based quality improvement interventions. As recommended within the knowledge-to-action cycle, future research is required to determine whether program implementation improves outcomes and is cost-effective.

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The effect of patient care order sets on medical resident education: a prospective before-after study. BMC Med. Educ.

2013-11-06

Investigators consecutively recruited 11 subjects before and 28 subjects after order set implementation. Residents in the order set period had a greater improvement in post-rotation test scores than residents in the no order set period (p = 0.04); after adjustment for baseline scores, this was not significant (p = 0.3). The questionnaire demonstrated excellent convergent, discriminant and construct validity. Residents reported that order sets improved their knowledge and skills and provided a systematic approach to care.

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