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Christopher Ryan - ADP. Louisville, KY, US

Christopher Ryan Christopher Ryan

Vice President, Strategic Advisory Services | ADP

Louisville, KY, UNITED STATES

Senior Executive with more than two decades of experience in human capital, health benefits, and population health

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Biography

As Vice President, Talent and Benefits Consulting for Strategic Advisory Services, Mr. Ryan is
responsible for strategic research and thought leadership to support ADP’s Talent and Benefits
clients. He brings more than two decades of consulting, thought leadership, and corporate
leadership in human capital, health benefits, and population health.

Most recently, Mr. Ryan has conducted research to identify best practices in the design and
execution of corporate health programs, including consumer directed health, health exchanges,
employee health and productivity, health incentives, and employee wellness strategies. A noted
speaker and author, his publications include Making Consumerism Work, the SHPS Health
Practice Study, the Human Capital Barometer, Making Medicaid Work, and Managing Employee
Health and Costs in a Down Economy. As a consultant, Mr. Ryan works with major corporations,
not-for-profits, and government agencies to develop effective strategies to improve overall
employee health while reducing total employer health spend.

Mr. Ryan joined ADP through the acquisition of SHPS HR Solutions, a division of SHPS|Carewise
Health. At SHPS, he served as EVP, Chief Strategy and Marketing Officer, where he oversaw
marketing, product management, clinical services, and health analytics across the enterprise.
Prior to SHPS, Mr. Ryan held consulting and leadership positions in general management and at
Hewitt Associates, Arthur Andersen, Watson Wyatt, and Deloitte & Touche.

He is a graduate of the University of Chicago and holds a Bachelor of Arts in physics. Mr. Ryan
also holds a Master of Business Administration degree in marketing and management policy
from the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University.

Areas of Expertise (7)

Human Capital Management Healthcare Consumerism Health Policy Talent Management Succession Planning Absence Management Healthcare Reform

Education (2)

Northwestern University, Kellogg Graduate School of Management: M.B.A., Marketing and management policy

University of Chicago: B.A., Physics

Event Appearances (2)

The Changing Economics of the Part-time Workforce

World at Work: Total Rewards 2013  http://ctsds.psav.com:8080/webUI/login.cgi

2013-04-29

Top Concerns around Absence Management: Why Employers Fail to Measure and Mitigate Absenteeism

HR.com Webinar  http://www.hr.com//en/webcasts_events/webcasts/archived_webcasts_and_podcasts/top-concerns-around-absence-management-and-why-emp_h6sbsftx.html?s=lUye0tThjIv8qUccOrt

2012-10-03

Sample Talks (2)

Top Concerns around Absence Management: Why Employers Fail to Measure and Mitigate Absenteeism

Twenty years after the passage of the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA), employers and employees alike continue to grapple with the issue of unplanned and extended employee absence. FMLA launched the emerging field of Total Absence Management (TAM) – the HR administrative framework for measuring and mitigating the effects of employee absence, coordinating leave administration with other benefits programs. How effectively are you executing TAM today?

The Changing Economics of the Part-time Workforce

How will the part-time workforce change during the next decade? The ADP Research Institute has used its proprietary research database to identify critical economic trends in the cost and composition of the part-time workforce, and its role as part of the total U.S. workforce. With trend data in hand, look at potential impacts associated with health-care reform and proliferating leave administration, and walk through some different scenarios around the future cost of the part-time workforce.

Style

Availability

  • Keynote
  • Moderator
  • Panelist

Fees

*Will consider certain engagements for no fee
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