hero image
Ginger Cameron, Ph.D. - Cedarville University. Cedarville, OH, US

Ginger Cameron, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice | Cedarville University

Cedarville, OH, United-States

Specializing in Infectious Diseases

Media

Publications:

Documents:

Photos:

loading image loading image

Videos:

Cedarville Faculty on Ebola Outbreak Growing concern for Zika Virus

Audio:

Social

Biography

Dr. Cameron has worked with the military and their families as well as the underserved during her career. She has presented nationally and has worked in education for over 15 years. Dr. Cameron has designed both corporate and community wellness programs, hosted numerous community health fairs, and launched a national health campaign. Her research interests are in post-traumatic stress disorder as well as occupational and behavioral health. She serves as a Disaster Management Responder.

Industry Expertise (5)

Education/Learning Health and Wellness Health Care - Providers Public Policy Medical/Dental Practice

Areas of Expertise (3)

Public Health Epidemiology Incidence, Distribution, and Possible Control of Diseases

Education (3)

Walden University: Ph.D., Public Health 2012

Walden University: M.P.H., Public Health

Union University: B.A., English

Affiliations (4)

  • LOHAS Lifestyles of Health + Sustainability
  • The National Institutes of Health
  • Public Health Foundation
  • Angus College

Media Appearances (4)

Zika vaccine could take months, years to develop

Dayton Daily News  

2016-02-21

Dr. Ginger Cameron, Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmacy practice at Cedarville University, has been following the Zika virus closely. She said testing and time are needed to develop a vaccine that works.

“According to the World Health Organization, we are about 18 months from a Zika vaccine, which is a relatively quick turn around for development of a vaccine,” she said. “Time is needed to learn how to best kill the virus and the best method of vaccination, and we have to test it to make sure it is both safe and effective. We are so accustomed to vaccines that it is easy to forget all the science that goes into development of one.”...

view more

Experts: Zika virus not a major threat to Ohio

Journal News  

2016-02-03

Dr. Ginger Cameron, Cedarville University professor of pharmacy practice, is an expert on infectious diseases and said it’s important to not overreact to Zika being declared a global emergency, but it’s also very important to pay attention to the facts.

“The virus has actually been around since the 1940s, but we have not ever seen a case in the Americas until 2014 when it landed in Brazil,” Cameron said. “Because of the living conditions in Brazil and because no one in the Americas has immunity from prior exposure, it has spread quickly.”...

view more

Local family copes with loss of baby from listeriosis

Dayton Daily News  

2016-01-29

Miscarriages have been reported in several listeriosis outbreaks and the infection also can be present in newborns if a mother has become infected. Sometimes a mother has few symptoms, said Ginger Cameron, an epidemiologist and assistant professor of pharmacy practice at Cedarville University.

“For pregnant women it is actually essential that they receive treatment,” Cameron said...

view more

Q & A: Ginger Cameron

Dayton Business Journal  online

2013-04-10

Cedarville University says the new director of assessment for its school of pharmacy will help shake things up for students as they prepare to enter a changing industry.

Ginger Cameron, a longtime educator, says that her experience in public health will bring an outside perspective to the school as she seeks to test how much students are really learning.

view more

Articles (2)

Occupational stress and health outcomes comparison of faculty teaching in online, on-ground, and mixed working environments Pedagogy in Health Promotion

2016

This quantitative cross-sectional comparative study used the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health occupational stress model to determine if stress levels and associated health outcomes vary among university educators based on work environment. Occupational stress has been identified as the most damaging form of stress, leading to lost work hours, low productivity, numerous health issues, and high health care costs. This study used a survey of 1,000 university instructors within the United States comparing undergraduate online educators who work remotely, undergraduate educators who work in an on-ground university, and undergraduate educators in a mixed environment. There was a significant difference in self-reported stress levels across groups, with on-ground educators experiencing more stress than online educators. No significant difference existed in health outcomes across groups.

view more

A cross-sectional study to examine occupational stress between online and on-ground educators Walden University

2012

Telecommuting is becoming increasingly common as more students turn to online education and additional institutions begin offering online courses. However, little research has been conducted on how an online work environment affects the overall health and occupational stress of educators. This quantitative cross-sectional comparative study used the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health occupational stress model to determine if stress levels and associated health outcomes vary among educators based on work environment. Occupational stress has been identified as the most damaging form of stress, leading to lost work hours, low productivity, numerous health issues, and high health care costs. This study used a survey sent to 1,000 instructors to compare undergraduate online educators who work remotely, undergraduate educators who work in an on-ground university, and undergraduate educators who work in a mixed environment. A series of 1-way ANOVAs were used to test hypotheses. It was found that there was a significant difference in self-reported stress levels across groups, with on-ground educators experiencing more stress than online educators. No significant difference existed in health outcomes across groups. Findings from this study can be used to create positive social change by addressing the stress levels of educators and developing stress-related prevention for this growing population. This could result in better control of stress and improved health outcomes associated with stress, thus leading to positive social change.

view more

Contact