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Jason Steinhauer - Villanova University. Villanova , PA, US

Jason Steinhauer Jason Steinhauer

Director, Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest | College of Liberal Arts and Sciences | Villanova University

Villanova , PA, UNITED STATES

Jason Steinhauer is an expert in American and public history, history in public life, history communication, fake news and media literacy.

Media

Publications:

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Photos:

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Videos:

Why Your Vote Didn't Count Television and Elections - Eisenhower, JFK & The Makings of the Celebrity President Media Inside Out: History Communication

Audio:

Social

Areas of Expertise (7)

History History on the Web Public History Fake History Fake News History in Public Life History Communication

Biography

Jason Steinhauer serves as the inaugural director of the Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest. He is a recognized emerging leader of America's cultural and historical institutions. He coined the term "History Communicators" and established the field of history communication. He has written for CNN, TIME, Poynter and Inside Higher Ed.

Education (2)

New York University: MA

The George Washington University: BA

Select Accomplishments (1)

Grand Prize for Excellence in Exhibitions (professional)

American Alliance of Museums, Ours to Fight For: American Jews in the Second World War museum exhibit

Affiliations (2)

  • Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Research Institute
  • Speakers Bureau, U.S. Department of State

Select Media Appearances (8)

Fake news spreads significantly faster than the truth - but don't blame Russian bots

International Business Times  

2018-03-09

Fake news is 70% more likely to be shared on Twitter compared with real news stories, a study has revealed. MIT-backed research, published in the latest edition of Science, claims that lies made on social media travel significantly "faster and deeper" than news items that are demonstrably true. … Jason Steinhauer, director for the Lepage Center at Vilanova University, told IBTimes that we have been conditioned to "privilege the novel and the new over the predictable and the constant. This has been an ongoing evolution since the 1830s, when Penny Presses published sensational stories that would appeal the broadest possible readership... Those papers quickly learned that sensational stories sold newspapers, and we continue to live with that legacy today on the internet."

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Historians Are Calling Out Trump Online Whenever He Misreads the Past

VICE  

2017-12-14

A new wrinkle seems to have developed this year in the relentless news cycle. ... A common thread runs through the work of Onion, Balogh, and Rosenwald, as Jason Steinhauer, director of the Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest at Villanova University, sees it. They all have journalistic skill sets, he says, which largely go untaught in collegiate history programs. While useful to seasoned historians, Steinhauer believes these skills are especially crucial for younger ones, who face audiences that may be distrustful of journalists and academics alike. “Historians of the future are going to need to be charismatic personalities,” he says. “They are going to have to be fluent with different forms of technology, and they must be able to communicate their scholarship through non-traditional platforms.”

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Column: History Is Not There To Be Liked: On Historical Memory, Real and Fake

Foreign Policy Research Institute  

2017-09-15

My grandmother had an excellent memory. We would sit at her kitchen table in Montreal, in the home my mother grew up in, and she would describe her childhood in Poland 70 years earlier. She lived in Gorzków, 50 miles from the Ukraine border, and her father owned a lumberyard in Krasnobród. He traveled there each week by horse and buggy, passing the goyische cemetery on his way. Non-Jews lived on the outskirts of Gorzków; Jewish families lived around the main square. It was a bustling place, my grandmother recalled. “It was a city!” she said.

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Op-ed: Networks let us down when they don’t put historians on TV

Poynter  

2017-08-24

This month's events in Charlottesville have shown how vital history is to our identity and how we make sense of our world. How do we understand such moments of violence, confrontation and anger? Where do these movements and sentiments originate? What type of nation are we, where acts of bigotry and hate can happen?

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Op-ed: The Twitter Problem That Could Change History

CNN  

2017-07-02

Those distracted by our recent political theater may have missed an extraordinary international incident at the end of May: Russia and Ukraine got into a Twitter war about history.

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Column: Of Fake News and Fake History

Foreign Policy Research Institute  

2017-06-22

It seems we are in the midst of a crisis of information—or, rather, a crisis of misinformation. The epidemic has been dubbed “fake news,” a term initially coined by the news media to describe stories on the internet posted by websites of questionable integrity. The term has since been turned back on the media, in America at least, by the Conservative political establishment— including by current President Donald Trump who levies accusations of the “fake news mainstream media” against the likes of CNN, the Washington Post, the New York Times, and others. We now have a constant back and forth in the public sphere: the media accuses online outlets of being fake, and politicians, in turn, accuse the media of being fake.

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Op-ed: History Is Hot

Inside Higher Ed  

2016-08-18

Within a span of 24 hours, four articles appeared in my Twitter feed that featured historians in major media outlets. The New York Times ran a story about biographer David McCullough and documentarian Ken Burns. The two have asked distinguished historians to state their case on why Donald Trump is, perhaps, the most troubling presidential candidate ever.

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Op-ed: America’s Students Need History—But Not for the Reasons You’re Hearing

TIME  

2015-09-18

Back-to-school season is here, and with it all the familiar trappings—save one. Whereas in recent years national discussion has seemingly centered on America’s deficits in math and science, this year deficits in U.S. history are sharing the spotlight.

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