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Jonathan McGavock - Diabetes Canada. Winnipeg, MB, CA

Jonathan McGavock Jonathan McGavock

Associate Professor and CIHR Applied Health Chair | Diabetes Canada

Winnipeg, MB, CANADA

Dr. McGavock’s research program is focused the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes in youth

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The Race To Save Lives: Researcher Jonathan McGavock Understanding Heart Disease Risk in the Womb

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Biography

Jonathan McGavock is a CIHR Applied Health Chair in Resilience and Obesity in Children. He is also an Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Manitoba. He has a Bachelor's Degree in Physical Education from the University of Manitoba, a Master's Degree in Exercise Physiology from McGill University and a PhD in Exercise Science from the University of Alberta. He completed post-doctoral fellowships at the University of Alberta and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Centre prior to establishing his own lab.

He established the Centre for Physical Activity and Cardiometabolic Health at the Children’s Hospital Institute of Manitoba in 2006 to study the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes in youth. His lab has held continuous CIHR funding from 2008-2019. He is currently the lead for the DREAM and DEVOTION research teams within the institute, which are both focused on reducing the burden of type 2 diabetes in youth in Manitoba. Collectively, these two themes have secured over $22M in external funding to address the growing rates of type 2 diabetes in children in Canada. Jonathan has been partnering with several Indigenous communities in Manitoba over the last 7 years to help establish novel strengths-based programs to prevent and manage type 2 diabetes in youth. He currently is the PI for a CIHR Pathways team grant that assembled Canada’s largest network of scientists and Indigenous communities focused on the prevention of type 2 diabetes among Indigenous youth.

His lab is currently funded by CIHR, the Canadian Diabetes Association, the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Research Manitoba and the Lawson Foundation.

Industry Expertise (4)

Health and Wellness Research Non-Profit/Charitable Health Care - Providers

Areas of Expertise (5)

Prevention & Management of Type 2 Diabetes Human Physiology Improving Metabolic Control Prevention of Obesity Diabetes in Aboriginal Populations

Education (5)

University of Manitoba: Bachelor's Degree, Kinesiolgoy 1997

McGill University: Master's Degree, Kinesiology and Exercise Science 1999

University of Alberta: Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Kinesiology/Endocrinology 2003

University of Alberta: Post Doctoral Fellowship, Cardiovascular Science 2004

The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: Post Doctoral Fellowship, Internal Medicine 2006

CIHR-HSFC-CDA-Funded Target Obesity Fellowship

Media Appearances (3)

Medicine for the mind

Winnipeg Free Press  online

2015-02-17


It didn't take long for pediatric exercise scientist Jonathan McGavock to realize that his years of education were virtually useless in preventing obesity and Type 2 diabetes among kids most at risk.

In an effort to keep children healthy, McGavock used to teach the kids he worked with how to exercise effectively and eat nutritiously.

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Older kids can help reduce diabetes in younger ones: Manitoba study

CTV News  online

2014-02-11

A study suggests older kids counselling younger kids in nutrition and activity can reduce childhood diabetes by at least 15 per cent.
The year-long study showed children could reduce their waist size by 1.42 centimetres -- taking into account normal growth over a school year -- because they'll tune in to the advice of their school's oldest students.

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Mentoring by older kids can help cut diabetes in younger children, Manitoba researchers find

The Star  online

2014-02-14

A study suggests older kids counselling younger kids in nutrition and activity can reduce childhood diabetes by at least 15 per cent.
The year-long study showed children could reduce their waist size by 1.42 centimetres — taking into account normal growth over a school year — because they’ll tune in to the advice of their school’s oldest students.

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Articles (5)

Pancreatic Lipid Content Is Not Associated with Beta Cell Dysfunction in Youth-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Elsevier

2015-06-19

Objective: To determine whether pancreatic lipid content is associated with type 2 diabetes and beta cell function in Indigenous and Caucasian adolescents.

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Targeting Skeletal Muscle Mitochondria to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes in Youth Biochemistry and Cell Biology

2015-05-17

The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has increased dramatically over the past two decades, not only among adults but also among adolescents. T2D is a systemic disorder affecting every organ system and is especially damaging to the cardiovascular system, predisposing individuals to severe cardiac and vascular complications.

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Fitness is a determinant of the metabolic response to endurance training in adolescents at risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus Obesity

2015-04-01

The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to determine whether changes in cardiorespiratory fitness are associated with the metabolic response to endurance training in adolescents at risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

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The blood pressure response to exercise in youth with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes. Pediatric exercise science

2015-02-01


Type 2 diabetes is associated with hypertension and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. In adults, blood pressure (BP) responses to exercise are predictive of these complications.

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The association between time spent in vigorous physical activity and dietary patterns in adolescents: a cross-sectional study. Journal of physical activity & health

2015-02-01

Physical activity interventions targeting weight status have yielded mixed results. This variability may be attributed to compensatory changes in dietary patterns after increasing physical activity (PA) levels. Therefore, we sought to determine whether dietary patterns varied with time spent in vigorous-intensity PA in youth.

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