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Mike Hamm - Michigan State University. East Lansing, MI, US

Mike Hamm Mike Hamm

C. S. Mott Chair in Sustainable Agriculture | Michigan State University

East Lansing, MI, UNITED STATES

Expert in community-based food systems, food security, sustainable agriculture, and nutrition education

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Mike Hamm- C.S. Mott Chair of Sustainable Agriculture, Michigan State University

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Biography

Mike Hamm is the C.S. Mott Professor of Sustainable Agriculture and CRFS Senior Fellow. Mike is affiliated with the departments of community sustainability; plant, soil and microbial sciences; and food science and human nutrition. His appointment encompasses teaching, research and outreach. Community food security and community, regional, and sustainable food systems are research interest areas. Mike founded the C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Agriculture in 2003 and was founding director of the MSU Center for Regional Food Systems from 2011-2015. Prior to moving to MSU, he was Dean of Academic and Student Programs for Cook College, Rutgers University. As a faculty member at Rutgers University, he was co-founder and director of the New Jersey Urban Ecology Program and founding director of the Cook Student Organic Farm. He was also facilitator for the New Jersey Cooperative Gleaning Network and a board member/board president of the Northeast Organic Farming Association of New Jersey.

Industry Expertise (5)

Writing and Editing Agriculture and Farming Research Education/Learning Environmental Services

Areas of Expertise (5)

Sustainable food systems Recreation and Resource Studies Communities Agriculture Community Food Security

Education (1)

University of Minnesota: Ph.D.

Journal Articles (3)

A Replicable Model for Valuing Local Food Systems Journal of Agricultural & Applied Economics

Steven R Miller, John Mann, Judith Barry, Tom Kalchik, Rich Pirog, Michael W. Hamm

2015

We use the underlying data of the IMPLAN Pro 3.0 regional economic simulation model to estimate the current economic contribution of Michigan's local food system and explore the chain of transactions giving rise to consumption of locally sourced goods from producer to processor to consumption. The proposed methodology includes both unprocessed and processed foods in the estimation of the local food system's economic value. The model also provides a replicable and consistent approach to estimating the value of local food systems within regional and state economies.

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Alignment of Healthy Dietary Patterns and Environmental Sustainability: A Systematic Review Advances in Nutrition

Miriam E. Nelson, Michael W. Hamm, Frank B. Hu, Timothy S. Griffin, Steven A. Abrams

2016

To support food security for current and future generations, there is a need to understand the relation between sustainable diets and the health of a population. In recent years, a number of studies have investigated and compared different dietary patterns to better understand which foods and eating patterns have less of an environmental impact while meeting nutritional needs and promoting health. This systematic review (SR) of population-level dietary patterns and food sustainability extends and updates the SR that was conducted by the 2015 US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, an expert committee commissioned by the federal government to inform dietary guidance as it relates to the committee's original conclusions. In the original SR, 15 studies met the criteria for inclusion; since then, an additional 8 studies have been identified and included. The relations between dietary intake patterns and both health and environmental outcomes were compared across studies, with methodologies that included modeling, life cycle assessment, and land use analysis. Across studies, consistent evidence indicated that a dietary pattern higher in plant-based foods (e.g., vegetables, fruits, legumes, seeds, nuts, whole grains) and lower in animal-based foods (especially red meat), as well as lower in total energy, is both healthier and associated with a lesser impact on the environment. This dietary pattern differs from current average consumption patterns in the United States. Our updated SR confirms and strengthens the conclusions of the original US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee SR, which found that adherence to several well-characterized dietary patterns, including vegetarian (with variations) diets, dietary guidelines-related diets, Mediterranean-style diets, the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, and other sustainable diet scenarios, promotes greater health and has a less negative impact on the environment than current average dietary intakes.

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A Replicable Model for Valuing Local Food Systems Conference: Southern Regional Science Association

Steven R Miller, John Mann, Judith Barry, Tom Kalchik, Rich Pirog, Michael W. Hamm

2015

We use the underlying data of the IMPLAN Pro 3 regional economic simulation model to estimate the current economic contribution of Michigan’s local food system and explore the chain of transactions giving rise to consumption of locally sourced goods from producer to processor to consumption. The model provides a replicable and consistent approach to estimating the value of local food systems within regional and state economies.

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