Norbert Schmitz - Diabetes Canada. Montreal, QC, CA

Norbert Schmitz Norbert Schmitz

Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Associate Member, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health | Diabetes Canada

Montreal, QC, CA

Dr Schmitz's research focuses on the role of lifestyle and psychological problems as risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes.

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Biography

Norbert Schmitz is an Associate Professor (tenured) in the Department of Psychiatry and an Associate Member in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at McGill University, Montreal. He is a researcher at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and a researcher at the Montreal Diabetes Research Center.

Dr Schmitz's research focuses on the role of lifestyle/behavioral factors and psychological problems as risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes and as risk factors for poor health outcome in people with type 2 diabetes.

Prior to joining McGill University in 2004, Dr Schmitz was an Assistant Professor at the Department of Psychosomatic Medicine at Heinrich-Heine-University in Duesseldorf, Germany, and Director of the Research Unit Public Mental Health. Dr Schmitz obtained his PhD in Statistics from the University of Dortmund (1995) and a second PhD in Epidemiology from Heinrich-Heine-University in Duesseldorf, Germany (2002).

Industry Expertise (4)

Education/Learning Health and Wellness Health Care - Facilities Health Care - Services

Areas of Expertise (7)

Diabetes Epidemiology Biostatistics Measurement Methodology Outcome Assessment Quality of Life Research Interaction of Physical and Mental Illness

Education (3)

Heinrich-Heine Universitat Dusseldorf: Post-doctorate Habilitation, Epidemiology & Biometrics 2002

Universitat Dortmund: Dr.rer.nat., Statistics 1995

Universitat Dortmund: Dipl.-Stat, Statistics 1991

Affiliations (1)

  • McGill University : Associate Professor (Tenured)

Media Appearances (5)

Depression Linked to Diabetic Complications

Health & Wellness Magazine  print

2015-04-01

Psychosocial factors play critical role in treatment.

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Mild depression tied to diabetes complications

Reuters  online

2013-12-03

"Minor depression is a form of chronic stress," said Dr. Norbert Schmitz, associate professor of psychiatry at McGill University's Douglas Mental Health University Institute in Montreal, who led the study.

"Patients may not be able to follow treatment guidelines or they may have problems with diet, which in turn results in an increased risk of poor functioning," he said...

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Diabetes & Depression Linked

Q92  radio

2012-11-08

There is a link between depression and Type Two diabetes.
Dr Norbert Schmitz, a professor and researcher from McGill University, is in Sudbury today to present his findings and answer questions during a public session.

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In Session With Norbert Schmitz, PhD

Psychiatry Weekly  print

2012-02-06

Our previous research on chronic conditions suggests that there is a synergistic relationship between obesity with a high level of psychological distress or depression and poor functioning and disability. In the present study, we examined data from a large prospective study, the Canadian National Population Health Survey, with over 18,000 participants, and 14 years of follow-up data, to assess the risk of developing disability as a result of obesity, psychological distress, or both.

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Mental Health and Neighbourhood Environment

CTV News at 6  tv

2011-01-28

Interview with Dr. Norbert Schmitz about the impact of neighborhoods on mental health.

Event Appearances (5)

Depressive Symptoms and Glycated Hemoglobin A1c: a Reciprocal Relationship in a Prospective Cohort Study

International Federation of Psychiatric Epidemiology Meeting  Bergen, Norway

2015-10-01

Depression and Diabetes: Is there a link?

Annual Research Day of the Montreal Diabetes Research Centre  Montreal

2015-02-02

The pattern of depressive symptoms in people with diabetes

Annual Meeting of the Canadian Academy of Psychiatric Epidemiology  Ottawa

2013-09-02

Characterizing The Course Of Depression In People With Diabetes: A Latent Class Analysis

WPA Section on Epidemiology and Public Health Meeting  Sao Paulo, Brazil

2012-03-15

Depression and disability in diabetes: A prospective community study

21st World Diabetes Congress  Dubai, United Arab Emirates

2011-12-02

Articles (5)

The Relationship between Diabetes and Mental Health Conditions in an Aging Population Canadian Journal of Diabetes

2016

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Depression and risk of type 2 diabetes: the potential role of metabolic factors Molecular Psychiatry

2016-02-23

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the interaction between depressive symptoms and metabolic dysregulations as risk factors for type 2 diabetes. The sample comprised of 2525 adults who participated in a baseline and a follow-up assessment over a 4.5-year period in the Emotional Health and Wellbeing Study (EMHS) in Quebec, Canada.

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Depressive symptoms and glycated hemoglobin A1c: a reciprocal relationship in a prospective cohort study Psychol Med

2015-12-01

Our results suggest a dynamic relationship between depressive symptoms and HbA1c which might be mediated by both lifestyle and cardiometabolic factors. This has important implications for investigating the pathways which could link depressive symptoms and increased risk of diabetes.

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Recurrent Subthreshold Depression in Type 2 Diabetes: An Important Risk Factor for Poor Health Outcomes Diabetes Care

2013-10-29

Recurrent subthreshold depressive symptoms might be an important risk factor for poor health outcomes in type 2 diabetes. Early identification, monitoring and treatment of recurrent subthreshold depressive symptoms might improve functioning and quality of life in people with type 2 diabetes.

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Longitudinal Relationships Between Depression and Functioning in People with Type 2 Diabetes Annals of Behavioral Medicine

2013-09-18

Depression and functioning might interact with each other in a dynamic way: depression at one assessment point might predict poor functioning at the next assessment point, which in turn might predict depression at the next assessment point. This should be taken into account in both treatment and research programs.

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