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Robert Buresh, Ph.D. - Kennesaw State University. Kennesaw, GA, US

Robert Buresh, Ph.D. Robert Buresh, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Exercise Science | Kennesaw State University

Kennesaw, GA, UNITED STATES

Robert Buresh studies the influence of exercise on glucose control and tolerance in individuals with Type 2 diabetes.

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Biography

A long-time broadcast technician, Robert Buresh earned his M.S. in Exercise Science from the University of Nebraska at Omaha, and accepted his first full-time teaching appointment in 2003 as a fixed-term professor in the Health and Human Performance Department at Nebraska Wesleyan University in Lincoln, NE. Buresh held that position for four full academic years while pursuing and earning his Ph.D. from the University of Nebraska Medical Center, investigating the effect of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise in clinical markers of glucose control and tolerance in persons with type 2 diabetes. Though the influence of various forms of exercise on glucose tolerance is his primary research focus, he also continues to be interested in the hormone response to resistance exercise training, and on the influence of body weight on endurance performance.

Industry Expertise (5)

Education/Learning Health and Wellness Research Sport - Amateur Sport - Professional

Areas of Expertise (6)

Exercise Science Health and Human Performance Aerobic Exercise Type 2 Diabetes Exercise Hormones and exercise

Education (2)

University of Nebraska Medical Center: Ph.D., Exercise Science

University of Nebraska at Omaha: M.S., Exercise Science

Recent Papers (5)

The effect of resistive exercise rest interval on hormonal response, strength, and hypertrophy with training The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

2009

The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of different between-set rest periods (1 and 2.5 minutes) on changes in hormone response, strength, arm cross-sectional area (CSA), thigh muscular cross-sectional area (MCSA), and body composition during a 10-week training period...

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Sit-and-reach flexibility and running economy of men and women collegiate distance runners The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

2009

Flexibility has been controversially suggested as one of the biomechanical factors contributing to the variability observed in running economy among distance runners. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the magnitude of the relationship between sit-and-reach flexibility and running economy in men and women...

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Heat production and storage are positively correlated with measures of body size/composition and heart rate drift during vigorous running Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

2005

The purposes of this study were to determine the relationships between: (a) measures of body size/composition and heat production/storage, and (b) heat production/storage and heart rate (HR) drift during running at 95% of the velocity that elicited lactate threshold, which was determined for 20 healthy recreational male runners...

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Relationship between measures of body size and composition and velocity of lactate threshold. The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

2004

The purpose of this investigation was to explore the relationship between velocity of lactate threshold (vLT) and various measures of body mass and composition: mass, lean mass, fat mass, percent body fat (% fat), and body surface area (BSA). We hypothesized that mass would be inversely related to vLT, and that differences in measures of body mass and composition would account for a significant amount of variability in vLT...

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Scaling oxygen uptake to body size and several practical applications The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

2002

Oxygen uptake (Vo2) has typically been expressed in milliliters per kilogram per minute to equate people of different body masses. However, research suggests that Vo2 increases in proportion to body mass raised to a power between 0.6 and 0.75, rather than in proportion to body mass raised to a power of 1...

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