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Thomas F. Babor, Ph.D. - University of Connecticut. Farmington, CT, US

Thomas F. Babor, Ph.D. Thomas F. Babor, Ph.D.

Professor and Endowed Chair in Community Medicine and Public Health | University of Connecticut

Farmington, CT, UNITED STATES

Professor and Endowed Chair in Community Medicine and Public Health focused on alcohol advertising and regulation.

Biography

Dr. Babor spent several years in postdoctoral research training in social psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and subsequently served as head of social science research at McLean Hospital's Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Center in Belmont, MA. In 1982 he moved to the University of Connecticut School of Medicine. He has served as the Scientific Director at the Alcohol Research Center and the interim Chair of the Psychiatry Department before moving to Community Medicine in 1998.

Dr. Babor is head of the Department of Community Medicine and Health Care and directs an active research program. He is also Associate Editor-in-Chief and Regional Editor of the international journal, Addiction

Areas of Expertise (8)

Treatment Evaluation Screening and Prevention Addiction Alcohol Advertising Alcohol Drug Abuse Alcohol Regulation Diagnosis

Education (4)

Harvard School of Public Health: M.P.H., Psychiatric Epidemiology

University of Arizona: Ph.D., Social Psychology

University of Arizone: M.A., Psychology

Manhattan College: B.A., Psychology

Affiliations (5)

  • Working Group on Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders International Advisory Group for the Revision of ICD-10 Mental and Behavioural Disorders WHO Mental Health and Substance Abuse Department, Advisory Committee
  • International Society of Addiction Journal Editors, President
  • Expert Advisory Panel on Drug Dependence and Alcohol Problems, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, Member
  • Adicciones, Editor
  • Addiction, Editor

Accomplishments (4)

Distinguished International Scientist Collaboration Award (professional)

Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs, Stockholm University

First Prize in Public Health Category (professional)

British Medical Association

Medical Book Competition Alcohol: No Ordinary Commodity (professional)

Oxford University Press

The Jellinek Memorial Prize (professional)

University of Toronto

Social

Media

Publications:

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Videos:

Dr Thomas Babor: Alcohol Forum Conference 2015 Thomas Babor speaking about alcohol advertising ban and advocacy Thomas Babor: políticas de regulación de alcohol

Audio:

Media Appearances (2)

Utah sets lowest DUI limit in country: anomaly or trendsetter?

The Christian Science Monitor  

2017-03-13

“I believe it’s not going to have a dramatic effect on the restaurant industry,” Thomas Babor, a public health professor at the University of Connecticut in Mansfield, Conn., tells the Monitor. “People who are careful about their drinking will not be affected. It’s the people whose blood-alcohol content levels were high. Those people are going to, I think, be much more attentive to how many drinks they have, and maybe will wise up in terms of getting a designated driver in their group to refrain from drinking at a restaurant or bar.”...

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Joe Camel in a bottle: Alcohol companies fail to follow their own ad rules during the 2017 Super Bowl

The Conversation  online

2017-02-07

lcohol companies used controversial marketing tactics in their 2017 Super Bowl commercials, including the use of animals that are attractive to children and party themes found to influence underage drinking. (...)

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Event Appearances (1)

Codes, Kids, and the World Cup: The Case Against Industry Self-Regulation of Alcohol Marketing

Alcohol Policy Conference  Arlington, VA

2016-04-06

Articles (3)

Harmful Use of Alcohol: A Shadow over Sub-Saharan Africa in Need of Workable Solutions Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health

Carina Ferreira-Borges, Charles D.H. Parry, and Thomas F. Babor

2017

Alcohol consumption and alcohol-attributable burden of disease in Africa are expected to rise in the near future, yet. increasing alcohol-related harm receives little attention from policymakers and from the population in general. Even where new legislation is proposed it is rarely enacted into law. Being at the center of social and cultural activities in many countries, alcohol’s negative role in society and contribution to countries’ burden of disease are rarely questioned. After the momentum created by the adoption in 2010 of the WHO Global Strategy and the WHO Regional Strategy (for Africa) to Reduce the Harmful Use of Alcohol, and the WHO Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Non-Communicable Diseases, in 2013, little seems to have been done to address the increasing use of alcohol, its associated burden and the new challenges that derive from the growing influence of the alcohol industry in Africa. In this review, we argue that to have a positive impact on the health of African populations, action addressing specific features of alcohol policy in the continent is needed, namely focusing on particularities linked to alcohol availability, like unrecorded and illicit production, outlet licensing, the expansion of formal production, marketing initiatives and taxation policies.

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Associations Between Thematic Content and Industry Self-Regulation Code Violations in Beer Advertising Broadcast During the U.S. NCAA Basketball Tournament Substance Use & Misuse

Jonathan K. Noel, Ziming Xuan & Thomas F. Babor

2017

Beer marketing in the United States is controlled through self-regulation, whereby the beer industry has created a marketing code and enforces its use. We performed a thematic content analysis on beer ads broadcast during a U.S. college athletic event and determined which themes are associated with violations of a self-regulated alcohol marketing code. Methods: 289 beer ads broadcast during the U.S. NCAA Men's and Women's 1999–2008 basketball tournaments were assessed for the presence of 23 thematic content areas. Associations between themes and violations of the U.S. Beer Institute's Marketing and Advertising Code were determined using generalized linear models. Results: Humor (61.3%), taste (61.0%), masculinity (49.2%), and enjoyment (36.5%) were the most prevalent content areas. Nine content areas (i.e., conformity, ethnicity, sensation seeking, sociability, romance, special occasions, text responsibility messages, tradition, and individuality) were positively associated with code violations (p < 0.001–0.042). There were significantly more content areas positively associated with code violations than content areas negatively associated with code violations (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Several thematic content areas were positively associated with code violations. The results can inform existing efforts to revise self-regulated alcohol marketing codes to ensure better protection of vulnerable populations. The use of several themes is concerning in relation to adolescent alcohol use and health disparities.

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Alcohol Marketing Regulation: From Research to Public Policy Addiction

Monteiro, M. G., Babor, T. F., Jernigan, D., and Brookes, C.

2017

Alcohol marketing, promotion and sponsorship are widespread in most of the world today. Alcohol marketing is evolving constantly and utilizes multiple channels, including youth-oriented radio, television, sports events and popular music concerts, websites, social media, mobile phones and product placements in movies and TV shows. Marketers are moving increasingly to digital and social media, where efforts at regulation have fallen far behind industry innovations in producing audience engagement and brand ambassadorship.

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