hero image
Todd BenDor, Ph.D. - UNC-Chapel Hill. Chapel Hill, NC, US

Todd BenDor, Ph.D.

Associate Professor and Director of the Ph.D. Program, Department of City and Regional Planning, College of Arts and Sciences | UNC-Chapel Hill

Chapel Hill, NC, UNITED STATES

BenDor's research aims to better understand the impacts that human activities and development can have on sensitive ecological systems.

Media

Publications:

Documents:

Photos:

loading image loading image

Videos:

Audio:

Social

Biography

Professor BenDor's research and teaching focus on producing better ways to understand the impacts that human activities and development can have on sensitive ecological and environmental systems. His research uses both qualitative and quantitative techniques to explore 1) improvements in environmental policy, particularly environmental markets, such as those used domestically to elevate water quality and protect and restore wetlands, 2) better and easier to use models of urban growth and change, and 3) improvements in environmental conflict resolution techniques. Dr. BenDor is also the Director of Carolina Planning's Ph.D. Program.

Areas of Expertise (10)

Human Impact on the Environment Ecology Environmental Planning Land Use Planning Urban Modeling Environmental restoration Environmental Policy Environmental markets Ecosystem services Water Quality

Accomplishments (5)

Honorary Visiting Professor (professional)

Fall 2016
Center for Advanced Spatial Analysis, University College-London, London, England

Frederick J. Clarke Scholar (2012) (professional)

Institute of Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Lone Mountain Fellow (2010) (professional)

Property and Environment Research Center

Sigma Xi Full Member (2009) (professional)

National Scientific Research Society

GlaxoSmithKline Faculty Fellow (2009) (professional)

Institute for Emerging Issues, N.C. State University

Education (3)

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: Ph.D., Urban and Regional Planning 2007

Washington State University: M.S., Environmental Science 2003

Worcester Polytechnic Institute: B.S., System Dynamics 2002

Affiliations (4)

  • National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center : Member Scientific Review Committee
  • Adviser State of North Carolina Sea Level Rise Risk Management Study
  • Member Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC)
  • Member EPA Sustainable and Healthy Communities Subcommittee (2014-2017)

Media Appearances (6)

The feds must start to value natural capital — what's next?

GreenBiz  online

2015-12-03

"I think a lot of folks will be waiting in the wings to see how this actually translates into new agency actions and regulatory changes/investment changes," said Todd BenDor, an associate professor of city and regional planning with an environmental specialty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill...

view more

The Value Of Nature To Be Recognized In Every US Federal Agency Under New Guidance

Ecosystem Marketplace  online

2015-10-09

“I think a lot of folks will be waiting in the wings to see how this actually translates into new agency actions and regulatory changes/investment changes” says Todd BenDor, an Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning with an environmental specialty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill...

view more

Ecological Restoration Is A $25 Billion Industry That Generates 220,000 Jobs

Ecosystem Marketplace  online

2015-07-08

“People want to know big picture numbers on industries,” said report author, Todd BenDor, an Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning with an environmental specialty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “We basically find ecological restoration is a $9.5 billion industry employing about 126,000 people directly.” On top of that, he found, the restoration economy indirectly generates $15 billion and 95,000 jobs, bringing restoration’s total economic output value to nearly $25 billion...

view more

A Drain On The Economy? Ecological Restoration Is A $9.5 Billion Industry

Fast Company  online

2015-07-06

In fact, the "restoration economy" is worth as much as $9.5 billion a year, according to a new estimate by Todd BenDor, an associate professor at the University of North Carolina, and four co-researchers.

"The public debate over restoration usually focuses on how many jobs are killed when environmental regulation requires restoration," says BenDor in an email. "We wanted to know how much economic impact restoration is having. Restoration is an essential part of the green economy, but it's really hard to measure since it's hard to even tell who is doing the work."...

view more

Saltwater Intrusion a Threat

The Greenville Reflector  online

June 14, 2015

North Carolina’s Albemarle-Pamlico peninsula is one of the state’s true natural treasures with its richness in wildlife and plant diversity. From tundra swans to black bears to marshes and wetland forests it is an area full of unique landscapes and habitats.

Now THIS is What we Call Green Jobs: The Restoration Industry 'Restores' the Environment and the Economy

Forbes  online

Jan. 8, 2014

Most people associate economic growth with expansion of the human built environment. Constructing more roads and more commercial and residential developments—“gray infrastructure”—means more jobs and a healthier overall economy.

However, increasing gray infrastructure often comes at a cost to natural ecosystems. For instance, over half of the globe’s wetlands, which provide “free” water filtration services, have been lost since 1900. As the global economy eliminates these mostly free services provided by nature’s “green infrastructure,” more “gray infrastructure” must be built to replace the lost ecosystem functions.

view more

Articles (6)

More information on Todd Bendor's research Todd Bendor

List of publications

view more

A dynamic analysis of the wetland mitigation process and its effects on no net loss policy Landscape and Urban Planinng

2009

ABSTRACT: Since 1980, US regulations have required compensatory mitigation for wetland losses, often through wetland creation or restoration. In 1987, the National Wetlands Policy Forum recommended that federal policy should aim to achieve overall “no net loss” of the ...

view more

Ecological and economic sustainability in fishery management: a multi-agent model for understanding competition and cooperation Ecological Economics

2009

ABSTRACT: Recent studies have shown that many marine ecosystems are experiencing an accelerating loss of population and biodiversity. It is apparent that there is a growing disparity between the available supply of fish and the desire of the growing world population to catch them. ...

view more

Landscape characteristics of a stream and wetland mitigation banking program Ecological Applications

2009

ABSTRACT: In the United States, stream restoration is an increasing part of environmental and land management programs, particularly under the auspices of compensatory mitigation regulations. Markets and regulations surrounding stream mitigation are beginning to ...

view more

Bioenergy and land use: a spatial-agent dynamic model of energy crop production in Illinois International Journal of Environment and Pollution

2009

ABSTRACT: To reduce dependence on foreign oil and natural gas and address concerns about climate change, the USA is increasingly developing renewable, domestic energy sources, notably biomass for the production of ethanol and biodiesel. Illinois, as one of the farming states of ...

view more

Modeling the spread of the emerald ash borer Ecological Modelling

2006

ABSTRACT: Recently, an invasive Asian beetle known as the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB)(Agrilus planipennis Coleoptera: Buprestidae) has emerged as a threat to ash trees in the Midwestern United States and Canada...

view more

Contact