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Anna Yeung-Cheung, Ph.D. - Manhattanville College. Purchase, NY, US

Anna Yeung-Cheung, Ph.D. Anna Yeung-Cheung, Ph.D.

Professor, Biology | Manhattanville College

Purchase, NY, UNITED STATES

An expert in Principles of Biology, Microbiology, Principles of Virology, Infectious Disease, and Human Disease.

Spotlight

Selected Media Appearances (7)

Our Experts Answer the Coronavirus Questions You’re Afraid to Ask

Daily Beast  online

2020-03-26

Irwin Redlener is director of the National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University and contributor to The Daily Beast. Michael Osterholm is director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota. Professor Anna Yeung-Cheung teaches classes at Manhattanville College on virology and infectious diseases.

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Everything we know about coronavirus so far

New York Post  online

2020-03-16

“You will feel sick for at least 7 to 10 days, and it could be much longer,” said Manhattanville College professor Anna Yeung-Cheung. “After a week, most people will start to feel better. But everybody’s immune system is different.”

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Why The Death Rate From Coronavirus Is Plunging In China

WAMC  

2020-03-03

Anna Yeung-Cheung, a microbiologist at Manhattanville College in New York, says she also worries about health workers. Yeung-Cheung, who is originally from Hong Kong, notes that many doctors there died during the SARS coronavirus outbreak of 2002-2003. And hundreds of Chinese health workers have been sickened in the COVID-19 outbreak — possibly, at least in part, because they were working so hard, she says.

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Why The Death Rate From Coronavirus Is Plunging In China

NPR  online

2020-03-03

Anna Yeung-Cheung, a microbiologist at Manhattanville College in New York, says she also worries about health workers. Yeung-Cheung, who is originally from Hong Kong, notes that many doctors there died during the SARS coronavirus outbreak of 2002-2003. And hundreds of Chinese health workers have been sickened in the COVID-19 outbreak — possibly, at least in part, because they were working so hard, she says.

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So, Should You Panic About Coronavirus Now?

Slate  

2020-02-25

Wait, then why did the coronavirus kill a 29-year-old doctor? Because he was a doctor. “It’s a dosage thing,” explains Anna Yeung-Cheung, a virologist at Manhattanville College. Health care workers are exposed to far more people, often pretty sick people, than the average person, and therefore stand to come in contact with higher levels of the virus. A lot of virus can still overwhelm a healthy immune system.

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How Hong Kong’s Unrest Is Spilling Onto N.Y. Campuses

The New York Times  

2019-09-20

That sentiment wasn’t always the case, particularly in the years following Tiananmen Square in 1989, said Anna Yeung-Cheung, a professor of biology at Manhattanville College and a Hong Kong native who has been an activist for more than 20 years. “Back then, the mood was that we were Hong Kongers, but we were part of China,” Ms. Yeung-Cheung said. “The identification was not as clear.”...

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He watched the Hong Kong protests from his Virginia apartment and decided he had to join

The Washington Post  

2019-06-21

Anna Yeung-Cheung, a professor of biology at Manhattanville College in Purchase, N.Y., immigrated from Hong Kong in 1987 and is a coordinator for the Facebook group Global Solidarity for Hong Kong. The professor, 54, said protests abroad have largely mirrored the “leaderless” movement in the city itself, with pockets of citizens voluntarily organizing events...

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Selected Articles (5)

A Novel Ex Vivo Bioassay Suggests DEET is an Effective Repellent of Rhipicephalus Sanguineus Journal of Agricultural and Urban Entomology

Philip Meade, Alfa L. Abate, Jason Pavo, Anna K. Yeung-Cheung, Christopher J. Pappas

2017 Ticks are vectors that pose a threat to public health. N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) is commonly applied as a repellent to prevent attachment of ticks to humans and animals. Typical commercially available repellents contain between 5–100% DEET. Lower concentrations of DEET may be necessary to minimize potential health risks associated with DEET. To characterize the repellency of low concentrations of DEET, we performed an in vitro vertical bioassay, and developed a novel ex vivo vertical bioassay using porcine skin for use with the adult brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille) (Acari: Ixodidae). DEET applied at concentrations of 0.19% in vitro and 12.5% ex vivo immediately after application, and at 0.38% in vitro and 40% ex vivo at 4 h after application, repelled over 90% of ticks. In both in vitro and ex vivo assessments, and at both 0 and 4 h post application, the repellency against female ticks was similar to that against male ticks. This study demonstrates that concentrations of DEET lower than those in commercial repellents may provide sufficient repellency when potential tick exposure occurs shortly after application. Additionally, the development of a porcine ex vivo bioassay provides an alternative assessment tool for future repellency studies.

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The in vitro studies of the inhibitory effect of green tea (Camellia sinensis) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa treated contact lenses Journal of Young Investigators

Author: Mariah A. Bigaud & Anna Kam-Ha Yeung-Cheung

2017 Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of ocular infections in those who wear contact lenses. Others have previously done a study using the antioxidant selenium-coated contact lenses to inhibit the bacteria in an animal model. However, selenium is very toxic even in small quantities. In this study, green tea which is known for its antioxidant property was used to treat contact lenses. We did a disc diffusion assay using different concentrations of green tea and compared with black tea to study their inhibitory effect on P. aeruginosa. The 100mg/mL of green tea was the most effective concentration that maintained a uniform solution and produced the clear zone. Contact lenses were treated with 100mg/mL of green tea before being exposed to P. aeruginosa and another experiment was done by coating the contact lenses with the bacteria and treated with the green tea afterward. We found that green-tea-treated contact lenses had fewer bacteria, with a 41.9% inhibition rate when compared to the control but the results were not significant. However, green tea significantly reduced the bacteria present on contact lenses (p < 0.05). In conclusion, green tea shows an inhibitory effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and has the potential to be used as a cleaning solution on contact lenses.

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D-limonene increases efficacy of rifampicin as an inhibitor of in vitro growth of opportunistic Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A. International Journal of Soil, Sediment and Water

Yeung-Cheung, A. K., P. Chu and J. Dega

2009 Harbor Island Park located in Mamaroneck Harbor was frequently closed due to the exceeding levels of enterococci found in the water. A filter system Gunderboom® BPSTM (Beach Protection System) was installed in 2002 at the beach to lower bacterial levels in the swimming area. Our previous studies in 2006 showed that the densities of E. coli and coliform bacteria recovered from water and sediment were significantly lower inside the Gunderboom® when compared to the outside and the surrounding watersheds: Mamaroneck River, Guion Creek, and Shore Acres Beach. However, higher densities of bacteria were found in Guion Creek which directly drains into the harbor. The current study focuses in the comparison of E. coli and enterococci levels from water and sediment samples collected from the upper areas of Guion Creek (Beaver Swamp, the stream at Rye Neck High School and Upper Guion Creek) and the lower areas of Guion Creek (Lower Guion Creek, outside and inside of the Gunderboom®). Water and sediment specimen were collected bi-weekly at these 6 sites from May to November of 2007, especially after heavy rainfall. The results showed that the densities of E. coli and enterococci were significantly lower inside the Gunderboom® which proved again the effectiveness of the filter in lowering bacteria in water. In addition, the densities of enterococci and E. coli were found significantly higher in water and sediment samples collected in Beaver Swamp, Rye Neck High School and Upper Guion Creek than the other 3 lower regions. In conclusion, our study suggests some non-point source bacterial contamination located in the upper areas of the Guion Creek and may contribute to the increased densities of E. coli and enterococci in the Mamaroneck Harbor.

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An evaluation of the effectiveness of the Gunderboom® in protecting waters from bacteria Journal of Environmental Health

Yeung-Cheung, A.K., Benevento, N.M., Pavel, D.M.

2009 Beaches located in the narrow inlet of Long Island Sound frequently contain high concentrations of bacteria. A Gunderboom® BPS™ (Beach Protection System) filter was installed in Harbor Island Park of Mamaroneck Harbor, New York, in 2002 to reduce bacterial levels in the water. Water and sediment collected inside and outside the Gunderboom® and other areas within Mamaroneck Harbor (Shore Acres Beach, Guion Creek, and Mamaroneck River) were tested for E. coli and total coliform bacteria and compared weekly from May through September 2006. The results showed that concentrations of E. coli and total coliform bacteria in water and sediment were significantly lower inside the Gunderboom® when compared to the other sites. One-third of the samples were collected within 48 hours of rainfall, and a positive correlation occurred between rainfall and bacterial levels in water. These results indicate the Gunderboom® has the potential to reduce bacteria in both beach water and sediment.

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Comparison of bacterial levels from water and sediments among upper and lower areas of Guion Creek Journal of Soil, Sediment and Water

Anna K. Yeung-Cheung

2009 Harbor Island Park located in Mamaroneck Harbor was frequently closed due to the exceeding levels of enterococci found in the water. A filter system Gunderboom® BPSTM (Beach Protection System) was installed in 2002 at the beach to lower bacterial levels in the swimming area. Our previous studies in 2006 showed that the densities of E. coli and coliform bacteria recovered from water and sediment were significantly lower inside the Gunderboom® when compared to the outside and the surrounding watersheds: Mamaroneck River, Guion Creek, and Shore Acres Beach. However, higher densities of bacteria were found in Guion Creek which directly drains into the harbor. The current study focuses in the comparison of E. coli and enterococci levels from water and sediment samples collected from the upper areas of Guion Creek (Beaver Swamp, the stream at Rye Neck High School and Upper Guion Creek) and the lower areas of Guion Creek (Lower Guion Creek, outside and inside of the Gunderboom®). Water and sediment specimen were collected bi-weekly at these 6 sites from May to November of 2007, especially after heavy rainfall. The results showed that the densities of E. coli and enterococci were significantly lower inside the Gunderboom® which proved again the effectiveness of the filter in lowering bacteria in water. In addition, the densities of enterococci and E. coli were found significantly higher in water and sediment samples collected in Beaver Swamp, Rye Neck High School and Upper Guion Creek than the other 3 lower regions. In conclusion, our study suggests some non-point source bacterial contamination located in the upper areas of the Guion Creek and may contribute to the increased densities of E. coli and enterococci in the Mamaroneck Harbor.

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Selected Event Appearances (5)

The effect of the combination treatment of D-limonene and rifampicin on the growth and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A at different growth stage.

Tribeta Honor Society NE-1 Convention, April, 2019  Hofstra University

The effect of the combination treatment of D-limonene and rifampicin on the growth and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A

Undergraduate Research Conference, April, 2019  Manhattanville College

The effects of ammonium sulfate on the survival of Lumbricus rubellus

Undergraduate Research Conference, April, 2010  Manhattanville College

The effect of the combination treatment of D-limonene and rifampicin on the growth and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A

The 8th Annual Westchester Undergraduate Research Conference  Manhattanville College, April, 2019

The effects of ammonium sulfate on the survival of Lumbricus rubellus

The 8th Annual Westchester Undergraduate Research Conference  Manhattanville College, April, 2019

Grants (5)

Tribeta Biological Honor Society Research Grant

By Wardah Alakrah $500

2018 Advisor: Anna K. Yeung-Cheung

Tribeta Biological Honor Society Research Grant

By Cristina Commisso & Thimmy Garbenius $420

2017 Advisor: Anna K. Yeung-Cheung

Tribeta Biological Honor Society Research Grant

By Olivia Drew $920

2016 Advisor: Anna K. Yeung-Cheung

Manhattanville Castle Scholar Research Grant

By Mariah Bigaud $1000

2015 Advisor: Anna K. Yeung-Cheung

Manhattanville Castle Scholar Research Grant

By Charlene Caoili $1000

2015 Advisors: Anna K. Yeung-Cheung & Christopher J. Pappas

Biography

Professor Anna Yeung-Cheung has been teaching at Manhattanville College since 2002. She received her B.S. from National Taiwan University and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Georgia. Before Manhattanville, she worked as a research scientist in the virology lab of SUNY Health Science Center in Brooklyn for five years. She was also a serology lab manager at Antech Diagnostics in 2001. She decided to go into teaching after she realized how much she enjoyed tutoring students in her free time. At Manhattanville, Prof. Yeung-Cheung teaches a variety of classes including Principles of Biology, Microbiology, Principles of Virology, Infectious Disease, Introduction to Human Disease, Nutrition in Health & Disease, and First-Year Seminar. “I try to have a fun class, and relate the teaching material to current events and even popular culture whenever possible,” she said. “I went to a college that had some pretty famous scientists as faculties, but everyone would fall asleep in their classes because they did not try to engage the students. So I try to create a fun learning environment for our students.” Prof. Yeung-Cheung’s expertise and research focus mainly on microbial contamination in recreational water and microbial ecology.

Areas of Expertise (6)

Nutrition in Health & Disease

Infectious Disease

Microbiology

Principles of Biology

Principles of Virology

Human Biology

Accomplishments (5)

First Place Frank G. Brook Award

2019 Tribeta Honor Society NE-1 District Convention at Hofstra University by Wardah Alakrah

Second Place Presentation Award

2017 Tribeta Honor Society NE-1 District Convention

Third place presentation award Tribeta Honor Society NE-1 District Convention

2014 College of Mount Saint Vincent by Philip Meade

Third Place Presentation Award

2014 Tribeta Honor Society NE-1 District Convention at College of Mount Saint Vincent by Philip Meade

Spirit of Tiananmen Award

2011 Offered by Visual Artists Guild New York Chapter, for the contribution in promoting the democracy in China

Education (3)

University of Georgia: Ph.D., Medical Microbiology 1993

University of Georgia: M.S., Microbiology 1990

National Taiwan University: B.S., Plant Pathology 1987

Affiliations (5)

  • Member, Council on Undergraduate Research
  • Member, Tri-Beta Biological Honor Society
  • Member, Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities
  • Member, American Society for Microbiology
  • Member, American Society for Microbiology