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Asli Aslan - Georgia Southern University. Statesboro, GA, US

Asli Aslan Asli Aslan

Assistant Professor | Georgia Southern University

Statesboro, GA, UNITED STATES

Dr. Asli Aslan specializes in Environmental Health Sciences

Media Appearances (1)

Researchers to pinpoint Ogeechee pollution at Kings Ferry

Savannah Now  

2014-12-20

“The public wants to know if they will get sick with exposure,” said Asli Aslan, an environmental microbiologist who is leading the investigation. “We want to know the possible sources of contamination. We will have an answer to that from this project. It will help us really restore that beach in the future.”...

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Articles (11)

Data on the risk perceptions of beach water safety in coastal Georgia Data in Brief

Jeff Jones, Aslī Aslan, Rakhi Trivedi, Maria Olivas, Mikayla Hoffmann

2018 These data reflect the perceptions of beach water quality drawn from a convenience sample of 238 visitors to Georgia (USA) beaches collected in June–July 2017 and are related to the research article entitled “Water quality and the perception of risk: a study of Georgia, USA, beachgoers” (Jones et al., 2018). Data were collected both via an online survey distributed through Facebook and through in-person questionnaires collected directly on the beaches.

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Presence of Antibiotic-Resistant Escherichia coli in Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluents Utilized as Water Reuse for Irrigation Water

Asli Aslan, Zachariah Cole, Anunay Bhattacharya, Oghenekpaobor Oyibo

2018 Providing safe water through water reuse is becoming a global necessity. One concern with water reuse is the introduction of unregulated contaminants to the environment that cannot be easily removed by conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). The occurrence of ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline-resistant Escherichia coli through the treatment stages of a WWTP (raw sewage, post-secondary, post-UV and post-chlorination) was investigated from January to May 2016. The highest concentrations of antibiotic resistant E. coli in the effluent were detected in April after rainfall. Ampicillin-resistant E. coli was the most common at the post UV and chlorination stages comprising 63% of the total E. coli population. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) analysis showed that one in five isolates was resistant to three or more antibiotics, and the majority of these E. coli were resistant to ampicillin, followed by sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin. The highest MIC was detected at the finished water after application of multiple disinfection methods. Tetracycline resistance was the least observed among others, indicating that certain drug families may respond to wastewater treatment differently. Currently, there are no policies to enforce the monitoring of antibiotic-resistant pathogen removal in WWTP. Better guidelines are needed to better regulate reuse water and prevent health risk upon exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

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Global Distribution of Human-associated Fecal Genetic Markers in Reference Samples from Six Continents Environmental Science and Technology

R. Mayer, G. Reischer, S. Ixenmaier, J. Derx, A. Blaschke, J. Ebdon, R. Linke, L. Egle, Ahmed, W., A. Blanch, D. Byamukama, M. Savill, D. Mushi, H. Cristóbal, T. Edge, M. Schade, A. Aslan, Y. Brooks, R. Sommer, Y. Masago, M. Sato, H. Taylor, J. Rose, S. Wuertz, O. Shanks, R. Mach, M. Zessner, A. Farnleitner

2018 Numerous bacterial genetic markers are available for the molecular detection of human sources of fecal pollution in environmental waters. However, widespread application is hindered by a lack of knowledge regarding geographical stability, limiting implementation to a small number of well-characterized regions. This study investigates the geographic distribution of five human-associated genetic markers (HF183/BFDrev, HF183/BacR287, BacHum-UCD, BacH, and Lachno2) in municipal wastewaters (raw and treated) from 29 urban and rural wastewater treatment plants (750–4 400 000 population equivalents) from 13 countries spanning six continents. In addition, genetic markers were tested against 280 human and nonhuman fecal samples from domesticated, agricultural and wild animal sources. Findings revealed that all genetic markers are present in consistently high concentrations in raw (median log10 7.2–8.0 marker equivalents (ME) 100 mL–1) and biologically treated wastewater samples (median log10 4.6–6.0 ME 100 mL–1) regardless of location and population. The false positive rates of the various markers in nonhuman fecal samples ranged from 5% to 47%. Results suggest that several genetic markers have considerable potential for measuring human-associated contamination in polluted environmental waters. This will be helpful in water quality monitoring, pollution modeling and health risk assessment (as demonstrated by QMRAcatch) to guide target-oriented water safety management across the globe.

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Water quality and the perception of risk: A study of Georgia, USA, beachgoers. Ocean and Coastal Management

Jones, J., Aslan, A., Olivas, M., Hoffman, M., Trivedi, R.

Water quality and the perception of risk: A study of Georgia, USA, beachgoers.

The impact of tides on microbial water quality at an inland river beach. Journal of Environmental Quality

Aslan A., Anderson, K., Chapman, A.

The impact of tides on microbial water quality at an inland river beach.

Analysis of food service organization risk classification and associated food safety violation frequency Journal of Environmental Health

Chang, P., Rochani, H., Mase, W., Jones, J., Aslan, A.

Analysis of food service organization risk classification and associated food safety violation frequency

Coliphages as a beach water quality indicator to protect swimmer’s health in coastal Georgia Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association

Gallard-Gongora, J., McGowan Munck, K., Jones, J. & Aslan, A.

Coliphages as a beach water quality indicator to protect swimmer’s health in coastal Georgia

New recreational water quality criteria and its impact on beach advisories in coastal Georgia Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association

Aslan A., Benevente, S.

New recreational water quality criteria and its impact on beach advisories in coastal Georgia

Analysis of the persistence of enteric markers in sewage polluted water on a solid matrix and in liquid suspension Water Research

Brooks, Y., Aslan, A., Tamrakar, S., Murali, B, Mitchell, J., & Rose, J.B.

Analysis of the persistence of enteric markers in sewage polluted water on a solid matrix and in liquid suspension

Influence of the extreme conditions on the water quality and material exchange flux in the Strait of Istanbul Journal of Marine Systems

Altıok, A., Aslan, A., Övez, S., Demirel, N., Yüksek, A., Kıratlı, N., Taş, S., Müftüoğlu, A. E., Sur, H.I., & Okuş, E.

Influence of the extreme conditions on the water quality and material exchange flux in the Strait of Istanbul

Evaluation of the host specificity of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron alpha-1-6, mannanase gene as a sewage marker. Letters in Applied Microbiology

Aslan, A. & Rose, J.B.

Evaluation of the host specificity of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron alpha-1-6, mannanase gene as a sewage marker.

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Research Grants (5)

What’s in your water: The state of drinking water quality in Evans County

Evans County CARES Foundation 

Microbial water quality in well water

Molecular identification of the sources of non-point pollution:Phase II: Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment

NOAA and GADNR 

Molecular identification of the sources of non-point pollution and microbial risk assessment upon exposure to recreational waters at Jekyll Island Beaches, Phase II: Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment

Molecular identification of the sources of non-point pollution Phase I: Microbial Source Tracking

NOAA and GADNR 

Molecular identification of the sources of non-point pollution and microbial risk assessment upon exposure to recreational waters at Jekyll Island Beaches, Phase I: Microbial Source Tracking.

Identification of the sources of pathogens in wetland sediments and their influence on beach water quality

NOAA and GADNR 

Identification of the sources of pathogens in wetland sediments and their influence on beach water quality

Identification of pollution sources in Fortson Pond

Jekyll Island Authority 

Identification of pollution sources in Fortson Pond

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Biography

Dr. Asli Aslan is a water microbiologist, and her research program bridges ecosystem and human health. She has ongoing funded projects on microbial source tracking, health risk assessment of water resources, and the ecology of pathogens in the aquatic environment. Dr. Aslan has been serving in various state and federal agencies and organizations as an adviser, reviewer, scientific committee member, and affiliated faculty. She is currently serving as the co-chair of the Water and Health Committee of the American Public Health Association.

Areas of Expertise (6)

Environmental Health Sciences

Water Quality

Environmental Molecular Microbiology

Global Environmental Health

Watershed Management

Wastewater Treatment

Education (4)

Michigan State University: Post Doctoral Researcher, Water Microbiology 2011

Istanbul University: Ph.D., Water Quality 2008

Istanbul University: M.Sc., Water Quality 2002

Istanbul University: B.S., Biology 1999

Affiliations (6)

  •  Co-Chair, American Public Health Association, Environmental Health Section, Water and Health Committee (2017-present)
  •  Co-chair, Georgia Public Health Association, Rural Health Section (2018-present)
  •  Adjunct Faculty, Department of Biology, Georgia Southern University (2017-present)
  •  Affiliate, Institute for Interdisciplinary STEM Education (2015-present)
  •  Affiliate, Georgia Coastal Research Council (2013-present)
  •  Affiliate, James H. Oliver Jr. Institute for Coastal Plain Science (2013-present)

Languages (2)

  • English
  • Turkish