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Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Dr.PH - Florida Atlantic University. Boca Raton, FL, US

Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Dr.PH Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Dr.PH

Sir Richard Doll Professor | Florida Atlantic University

Boca Raton, FL, UNITED STATES

Charles Hennekens is the first Sir Richard Doll Professor and senior academic advisor.

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International Academy of Cardiology: Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Dr.P.H.:  UPDATE ON ASPIRIN International Academy of Cardiology: Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Dr.P.H.: GUIDING PRINCIPLES

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Biography

Charles H. Hennekens is the first Sir Richard Doll Professor and senior academic advisor. He was first John Snow and first Eugene Braunwald Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and first Chief of Preventive Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. His 173 H-index ranks him #14 Top Scientist in World. He was 3rd most widely cited medical researcher in world and 5 of top 20 were former trainees. He is #81 in world history for saving 1.1 million lives. He is a Fellow of the American College of Preventive Medicine (FACPM) and the American College of Cardiology (FACC).

Areas of Expertise (7)

Cardiovascular Disease

Strengths and Limitations of Descriptive and Analytic Studies

Prevention and Treatment of Chronic and Acute Diseases

Preventive and Internal Medicine

Epidemiology

Study Design

Research

Accomplishments (7)

14 Top Scientists in the World

2015: based on H index of 173

Alton Ochsner Award Relating Smoking and Disease

2014: American College of Chest Physicians

Fries Prize for Improving Health

2013: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Inductee, Queens College Athletic Hall of Fame

2014: 30 of 150,000 graduates and the only inductee in Athletic and Achievement Halls of Fame

Founder’s Circle

2012: Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University

Dean’s Circle for establishing Sir Richard Peto Scholarship

2013: Weill-Cornell Medical College

Walter D. Kelly Award

2009: for distinguished contributions to mental health

Education (7)

Queens College, The City University of New York: D.Sc. 1997

Honoris causa

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey: D.Sc. 1996

Honoris causa

Harvard School of Public Health: Dr.P.H., Epidemiology 1975

Harvard School of Public Health: M.S., Epidemiology 1973

Harvard School of Public Health: M.P.H. 1972

Cornell University Medical College: M.D. 1967

Queens College: B.S. 1963

Affiliations (4)

  • Florida Medical License (ME 84539)
  • Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine : Member, Advisory Board
  • Queens College Athletics Hall of Fame : Honorary Chair, Selection Committee
  • Data Monitoring Committee, AMG 785 Phase 3 trials : Chair

Selected Media Appearances (10)

Assaults on science causing alarming and avoidable deaths in the U.S.

Phys.org  

2020-10-13

"The anticipated number of deaths from COVID-19 may become comparable to the most lethal epidemic of influenza in U.S. history, which occurred from 1918 to 1919 when approximately 675,000 Americans died," said Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Dr.PH, senior author, first Sir Richard Doll Professor and senior academic advisor in FAU's Schmidt College of Medicine. "In stark contrast to both the current U.S. epidemic of COVID-19 and the Spanish Flu of 1918-19, the 2018-19 flu season affected about 42.9 million Americans, of which about 61,200 died."

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Study Finds Lack of Colonoscopy Knowledge Among High-Risk Patients for Colorectal Cancer

Cancer Network  

2020-10-06

“Data from our study pose clinical and public health challenges to reduce the rates of recurrences of colorectal polyps as well as subsequent risks of colorectal cancer in these high-risk patients,” senior author Charles H. Hennekens, MD, DrPH, first Sir Richard Doll Professor and senior academic advisor in FAU’s Schmidt College of Medicine, said in the release. “More than 90% of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer are 50 years or older. The major risk factors for colorectal cancer are similar to those for heart attacks and stroke and include overweight and obesity, type 2 diabetes, as well as physical inactivity.”

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Practicing mindfulness with paced breathing could lower blood pressure

Consumer Affairs  

2020-09-09

“This pilot randomized trial might lead to further randomized trials of intermediate markers such as inhibition of progression of carotid intimal thickening or coronary artery atherosclerosis, and subsequently, a large scale trial to reduce stroke and heart attacks,” said researcher Dr. Charles H. Hennekens.

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Researchers Urge Halt in Prescribing Hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19

Infection Disease Special Edition  

2020-06-15

“Many patients who would benefit from the drug with lower risks [are] unable to fill their prescriptions,” said Charles H. Hennekens, MD, DrPH, the first Sir Richard Doll professor and a senior academic advisor at Florida Atlantic University Schmidt College of Medicine, in Boca Raton, and the senior author of the commentary.

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First Do No Harm

Infection Disease Special Edition  

2020-06-15

Researchers urged a moratorium on the prescription of chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine to treat or prevent COVID-19, except in the context of a randomized clinical trial or for compassionate use (Am J Med 2020 Jun 2. [Epub ahead of print]). Charles H. Hennekens, MD, DrPH, the first Sir Richard Doll Professor and senior academic advisory to the Dean of the Charles E. Schmidt Florida Atlantic University Schmidt College of Medicine, in Boca Raton, and the senior author of the commentary, talked with Marie Rosenthal, MS, managing editor of Infectious Disease Special Edition about why this is important.

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How safe are simple painkillers?

Pharmaceutical Technology  

2020-06-04

Professor Charles Hennekens from Florida Atlantic University acknowledges that the painkiller situation is far more complicated than most people would think. He urges healthcare providers to make individual clinical judgements about prescribing these common medications on a case-by-case basis. “You’ve got to look at the totality of evidence and what’s going with patients to make the best individual decision about what to do,” he says. “I’m not a big fan of making blanket statements.”

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Will an Aspirin a Day Help Your Heart?

Health Central  

2020-03-26

“In primary prevention [of cardiovascular disease], the balance of absolute benefits, which are lower than in secondary prevention patients, and risks of aspirin, which are the same as in secondary prevention, is far less clear,” said study author Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., senior academic advisor in Florida Atlantic University's Schmidt College of Medicine, in a news release.

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Aspirin to prevent colon cancer underutilized in high-risk patients

EurekAlert!  online

2019-02-07

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer deaths in the United States and advanced colorectal polyps are a major risk factor. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concluded that aspirin reduces the risk of colorectal cancer by 40 percent as well as recurrence of advanced polyps. Their guidelines suggest that, without a specific contraindication, health care providers should routinely prescribe aspirin to all patients with advanced colorectal polyps.

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Study examines aspirin use to prevent colorectal cancer

ScienceDaily  online

2019-02-07

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer deaths in the United States and advanced colorectal polyps are a major risk factor. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concluded that aspirin reduces the risk of colorectal cancer by 40 percent as well as recurrence of advanced polyps. Their guidelines suggest that, without a specific contraindication, health care providers should routinely prescribe aspirin to all patients with advanced colorectal polyps.

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Professor, MSD high school senior collaborate on homicide trends

Medical Xpress  online

2018-10-02

The vast majority of homicides in the United States are attributable to firearms. The rate of homicide due to guns is about 25 times higher in the U.S. than many other high-income countries. In the U.S., there are approximately 357 million guns among a population of about 323 million. Guns are present in about 1 in 3 households. In addition, gun-related suicide rates in the U.S. are about eight times higher than other high-income countries.

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Selected Articles (3)

Regular physical activity: Forgotten benefits The American Journal of MedicineF

Steven F. Lewis, Charles H. Hennekens

2015 Both men and women who engage in regular physical activity experience statistically significant and clinically important reductions in the risk of dying from coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States.1 Physical activity also reduces the risks of developing diabetes, hypertension, and colon cancer; enhances mental health; improves muscle, bone, and joint health, and helps maintain function and preserve independence in older adults.1 In fact, regular physical activity may ameliorate many of the emerging and increasingly prevalent clinical, public health, and fiscal challenges that accompany the “Graying of America.” For example, today, 24% of the US population is 50 years of age and over, and 17 million are aged between 75 and 85 years, a number estimated to grow to 30 million during the next 30 years.

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High frequencies of negative pretreatment results following presumptive antibiotic treatment for chlamydia and gonorrhea. Southern Medical JournalF

Andric B, Drowos J, Trepka MJ, Suciu G, Alonso A, Hennekens CH

2013 The purpose of this study was to determine the frequencies of negative test results among all patients aged 18 years and older receiving presumptive antibiotic treatment for chlamydia and/or gonorrhea at the Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic of the Palm Beach County Health Department. The treatment algorithms were based on guidelines of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. METHODS: Clinic logs were retrospectively reviewed for a consecutive case series of all 1209 patients treated from November 1, 2007 to October 31, 2008. Urogenital specimens were collected and analyzed. Laboratory results were obtained from the Health Management System of the Palm Beach County Health Department. RESULTS: Of the 1209 patients, 556 (46%) were treated for chlamydia, 30 (2.5%) for gonorrhea, and 623 (51.5%) for both. The frequencies of negative results were 68% for chlamydia or gonorrhea, 70.9% for chlamydia, 86.6% for gonorrhea, and 65.2% for chlamydia + gonorrhea. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that implementation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines by the Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic of the Palm Beach County Health Department results in presumptive treatment of more than two-thirds of patients with negative nucleic acid amplification test results for chlamydia, gonorrhea, or both. They also suggest the potential value of developing treatment algorithms to maximize treatment of patients with positive test results and minimize treatment of those with negative test results. One possible strategy to explore is the future utility of new testing and treatment methodologies in development.

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United States Counties with Low Black Male Mortality Rates The American Journal of MedicineF

Levine RS, Rust G, Kilbourne B, Aliyu M, Pisu M, Zoorob R, Goldzweig P, Juarez B, Husaini B, Hennekens CH

2013 In the United States, young and middle-aged black men have significantly higher total mortality than any other racial or ethnic group. We describe the characteristics of US counties with low non–Hispanic Black or African American male mortality (ages 25-64 years, 1999-2007).

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