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Cory Prust, Ph.D. - Milwaukee School of Engineering. Milwaukee, WI, US

Cory Prust, Ph.D. Cory Prust, Ph.D.

Professor | Milwaukee School of Engineering

Milwaukee, WI, UNITED STATES

Dr. Cory Prust’s areas of expertise include statistical signal and image processing, adaptive array processing and radar systems.

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Education, Licensure and Certification (2)

Ph.D.: Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University 2006

B.S.: Electrical Engineering, Milwaukee School of Engineering 2001

Biography

Dr. Cory Prust is a professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at Milwaukee School of Engineering. He teaches courses primarily in the Electrical Engineering program. His areas of focus include statistical signal processing, computational structural biology, adaptive array processing, and radar systems. He spent three years as a technical staff member at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory working on cutting edge technology, allowing him to bring real-world experience into the classroom.

Areas of Expertise (7)

Stastical Image Processing

Adaptive Array Processing

Statistical Signal Processing

Computer Engineering

Electrical Engineering

Computational Structural Biology

Radar Systems

Accomplishments (3)

Karl O. Werwath Applied Research Award, MSOE

2018

Falk Engineering Educator Award, MSOE

2015

U.S. Department of Education Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAANN) Fellowship

Purdue University, 2001 - 2004

Affiliations (3)

  • American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) : Member
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) : Member
  • Order of the Engineer : Member

Social

Media Appearances (2)

Outstanding faculty members receive awards

MSOE  

2018-09-17

Dr. Cory Prust, associate professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, received the Karl O. Werwath Engineering Research Award. Prust holds a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from MSOE and Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Purdue University. He has taught at MSOE since 2009 and received the Falk Engineering Educator Award from MSOE in 2015.

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Dr. Cory Prust '01

MSOE  

2017-11-28

Dr. Cory Prust’s door is always open to his students – and each spring the associate professor of electrical engineering has more than a few treat him with an unexpected visit. “I will have these moments when they run into my office – just smiling ear to ear–saying ‘It works, its works!’” Prust said.

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Event and Speaking Appearances (3)

Applications of the Analog Discovery Board to Upper-Level Electrical Engineering Courses

American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference and Exposition  Salt Lake City, UT

2018-06-24

Applications of the Analog Discovery Board to Upper-Level Electrical Engineering Courses

American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference and Exposition  Columbus, OH

2017-06-28

Low-cost Software-defined Radio for Teaching Communication Systems and Digital Signal Processing: A Hands-on Workshop

American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference and Exposition  Seattle, WA

2015-06-14

Patents (1)

Method for Low Sidelobe Operation of a Phased Array Antenna Having Failed Antenna Elements

US8354960B2

2013 Described is a method of modifying an antenna pattern for a phased array antenna having at least one failed antenna element. A number of proximate beamformers in a proximate angular region about a beamformer at an angle of interest are determined. Each of the proximate beamformers has a proximate beamformer weight vector. A corrected beamformer weight vector is determined for the angle of interest as a linear combination of the proximate beamformer weight vectors. Each element of the corrected beamformer weight vector that corresponds to one of the failed antenna elements has a value of zero. The method enables computation of low spatial sidelobe antenna patterns without requiring a recalibration of the antenna thereby enabling uninterrupted operation of systems that employ phased array antennas. The method can also be used to control taper loss or sidelobe level for phased array antennas that have no failed antenna elements.

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Research Grants (1)

Introductory Analog and Digital Communication Systems using Software-Defined Radio

MathWorks Academic Support 

April 2018

Selected Publications (5)

Senior Design: The Swiss Army Knife of the Curriculum

American Society of Engineering Education North Midwest Section Conference

Prust, C.J., Williams, S.M.

2013 Over the years, senior design courses in engineering curricula have been subject to numerous internal and external driving forces. Widespread adoption of senior design capstone experiences was dictated by the then Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) in the mid-1980’s. At that time, ABET began to specify a “culminating design experience” for all accredited engineering curricula.

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Low sidelobe antenna patterns with failed elements

IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP)

Krich, S.I., Weiner, I., Prust, C.J.

2012 Many radar and communication systems utilize phased antenna arrays where it is desirable to maintain low-sidelobes even when one or more individual antenna elements have failed. Traditionally, computing low-sidelobe beamforming with disabled elements requires accurate antenna element patterns. In this paper we present a new algorithm for computing low-sidelobe beamforming that only requires the original beamforming weights that produce low sidelobes when all elements are functioning normally. The algorithm is computationally inexpensive, does not require accurate knowledge of the antenna element patterns, and permits user adjustment of the trade-off between sidelobe level, taper loss, and mainbeam width. Near optimum low sidelobes are demonstrated in several examples.

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Highly scalable methods for exploiting a label with unknown location in order to orient a set of single-particle cryo electron microscopy images

SPIE/IS&T Electronic Imaging Conference

Prust, C.J., Wang, Q., Doerschuk, P.C., Johnson, J.E.

2012 A highly scalable method for determining the projection orientation of each image in a set of cryo electron microscopy images of a labeled particle is proposed. The method relies on the presence of a label that is a sufficiently strong scatterer such that its 2-D location in each image can be restricted to at most a small number of sites by processing applied to each image individually. It is not necessary to know the 3-D location of the label on the particle. After first determining the possible locations of the label in the 2-D images in parallel, the information from all images is fused to determine the 3-D location of the label on the particle and then the 3-D location is used to determine the projection orientation for each image by processing each image individually. With projection orientations, many algorithms exist for computing the 3-D reconstruction. The performance of the algorithm is studied as a function of the label SNR.

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Low sidelobe antenna patterns with failed elements

IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP)

Krich, S.I., Weiner, I., Prust, C.J.

2012 Many radar and communication systems utilize phased antenna arrays where it is desirable to maintain low-sidelobes even when one or more individual antenna elements have failed. Traditionally, computing low-sidelobe beamforming with disabled elements requires accurate antenna element patterns. In this paper we present a new algorithm for computing low-sidelobe beamforming that only requires the original beamforming weights that produce low sidelobes when all elements are functioning normally. The algorithm is computationally inexpensive, does not require accurate knowledge of the antenna element patterns, and permits user adjustment of the trade-off between sidelobe level, taper loss, and mainbeam width. Near optimum low sidelobes are demonstrated in several examples.

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Model-based statistical inference problems concerning non-linear 3-D tomography with applications to the structural biology of asymmetric virus particles

Purdue University

Prust, C.J.

2006 Electron microscopy provides noisy images of viruses that, quantitatively, are projections of the 3-D virus structure. The ensuing tomographic reconstruction problem is nonlinear since the orientation of each particle is unknown and only one image can be measured for each particle and hence, the measured image is related to an unknown 2-D projection of the structure. Statistical models can be formulated for both measurement noise and orientation uncertainty. Inference problems on parameters describing the 3-D virus structure can then be investigated by fusing data from single images of many identical particles. High-order symmetry of the particle, especially icosahedral symmetry, has been helpful in previous computations of such structures. In this work we consider reconstruction methods that are not based on total-particle symmetry. First we consider reconstruction of a spatially localized deviation from symmetry. We describe mathematical models and a two-stage algorithm for 3-D reconstruction of a tailed bacteriophage where the symmetries of the capsid and tail are incompatible. Numerical results from experimental images are presented for bacteriophage P22. In the second phase of this work we present statistical algorithms in which an initial symmetrical reconstruction undergoes relaxation of the symmetry constraint. Both algorithms and Cramer-Rao Bounds on performance of algorithms are presented. We believe such algorithms would be most useful in computing reconstructions of viruses having a symmetrical capsid and an asymmetrical nucleic acid core. A primary focus of this work is development of statistical tools for experimental design.

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