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Dale Peeples, MD - Augusta University. Augusta, GA, US

Dale Peeples, MD Dale Peeples, MD

Pediatric Psychiatrist / Associate Professor of Psychiatry | Augusta University

Augusta, GA, UNITED STATES

Peeples is a highly-regarded psychiatrist providing tips to maintain mental wellbeing throughout the COVID-19 outbreak.

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Media images and your child's mental health: advice from a psychiatrist - Part 2 Depression during the happiest time of the year

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Biography

Peeples is a child and adolescent psychiatrist who treats young patients and educate parents on psychological disorders such as anxiety, ADHD and depression. He is an expert in telepsychiatry and uses it to provide services to underserved populations. He also has an interest in juvenile corrections and works at the Augusta Regional Youth Detention Center, and the Augusta and Macon Youth Development Centers.

Areas of Expertise (7)

Foster Care and Adoptions

Medical Education

Juvenile Delinquency

Pediatric Psychiatry

Telepsychiatry

Psychiatry

Juvenile Corrections

Affiliations (1)

  • American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: Media Committee Member

Media Appearances (10)

Powered up parenting: protecting kids in a tech world

WRDW News 12/WAGT 26  tv

2017-05-04

Technology is crucial for our future leaders in this cyber world, but it comes with a dark side. Dr. Peeples warns too much screen time can lead to childhood obesity, sleep loss, and even depression. So parents should create a media plan and limit their children's screen time.

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Depression during the happiest time of the year

WJBF-TV  online

2016-12-07

The holidays for many are considered the happiest time of the year, but that is not the case for everyone. Some people find these months filled with sadness and depression. Dr. Dale Peeples a psychiatrist with the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University explains what causes the shift in mood.

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More kids get mobile devices at young age

The Augusta Chronicle  online

2016-10-08

For most parents, it’s no longer a matter of if your child will get a cellphone, but when.

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Dr. Dale Peeples discusses ADHD treatments and management

WJBF-TV  online

2016-08-16

It’s estimated some 6-million children in the Unite States have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

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Local teen highlights mental health struggles with his passion for music

WRDW  tv

2022-02-11

Dr. Dale Peeples, children’s psychiatrist at Augusta University said: “It’s a challenging time of life for everyone, you know. There are the typical struggles with identity, figuring out who you are, and your place in the world that everyone has to navigate and negotiate.” He says for many kids, it gets harder as they get older. “We do see that mental health issues begin to go on the rise around adolescents, so we see another peak when it comes to depression and anxiety,” he said.

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School violence, shootings on the rise post-pandemic

WRDW  tv

2022-03-21

Educators are seeing more fighting, more violence, and more gun violence in schools across the country. The Center for Homeland Defense and Security documented 249 shootings in schools in 2021 alone—nine of those, active shooters. Our I-TEAM found experts are calling the violence a ripple effect from the pandemic. Violence Nikki Martin has witnessed in her daughter’s school. “Kinda makes me feel helpless,” Martin said. Nikki Martin’s daughter goes to Hephzibah Middle School, and over the past several months, she’s noticed a shift in violence. Last month, out of options for help, she posted a video of students beating her daughter in the school gym, hoping it would create a conversation to spark change.

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The pandemic’s toll on youth mental health

The Augusta Press  online

2022-04-11

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has had a measurable, negative impact on the mental health of high school students according to data in a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The data, collected in 2021, found 37% of high school students reported they experienced poor mental health and 44% reported feeling persistently sad or hopeless. Students also provided details about some of the most severe challenges they have faced, with 55% reporting emotional abuse, such as being insulted or being sworn by a parent or other adult in the home. Eleven percent reported physical abuse including beatings and being kicked.

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Mental Health Matters: What your kids may or may not be saying

WJBF  

2022-05-12

The Means Report’s Mental health matters because you matter series continues as we turn our attention to our children, their mental health, and how we can help them. The pandemic had an impact on our children – just as it did all of us. Also, suicide rates are going up across the country. Why and what can we do? How can we spot the warning signs? Dr. Dale Peeples is a child and adolescent psychiatrist at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University and is here to help us understand what our kids may or may not be saying.

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What resources are there to serve Augusta mental health needs?

WRDW  tv

2022-07-11

A lack of mental health resources in Augusta is an issue we’ve covered for years. The Richmond County Sheriff’s Office says they’ve responded to more than 1,400 calls involving mental episodes or suicide from January through June 2022. That puts us on pace to pass last year’s total of nearly 2,700 calls. With an uptick, we wanted to know if there’s also an uptick in the focus on mental health resources in our area.

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Doctors say new school year increases anxiety for kids

WRDW  tv

2022-07-29

Safety, fitting in, or just ‘back-to-school nerves’, kids’ mental health should be at the front of the priority list heading into the new school year. We spent the day seeing what options are available for families. The new school year brings a lot of new things. “New environment, meeting new people, new teachers, new expectations, and school is work for kids. There’s always that anxiety,” said Associate Professor, Medical College of Georgia Dr. Dale Peeples.

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Answers (3)

We know kids are resilient. Those who have struggled the most over the last two years, can they turn the corner and get better?

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Are children mentally rebounding or adjusting back to a sense of normalcy after COVID?

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Is there a certain age group that you’ve seen that may be struggling more than others?

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Articles (3)

How connected are people with schizophrenia? Cell phone, computer, email, and social media use

Psychiatry Research

2015 Technologies such as Internet based social media network (SMN) websites are becoming an important part of many adult lives; however, less is known about their use in patients with schizophrenia. We need to determine (1) how “connected” are patients with schizophrenia?, (2) do these technologies interfere with the patient׳s illness?, and (3) do patients envision these technologies being involved in their treatment?

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US Medical Licensing Exam Scores and Performance on the Psychiatry Resident In-Training Examination

Academic Psychiatry

2014 This study explores relationships between US Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) and Psychiatry Resident In-Training Examination (PRITE) scores over a 10-year period at a university-affiliated program.

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Sadness, Suicide, and Their Association with Video Game and Internet Overuse among Teens: Results from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey 2007 and 2009

Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior

2011 We investigated the association between excessive video game/Internet use and teen suicidality. Data were obtained from the 2007 and 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), a high school-based, nationally representative survey (N = 14,041 and N = 16,410, respectively). Teens who reported 5 hours or more of video games/Internet daily use, in the 2009 YRBS, had a significantly higher risk for sadness (adjusted and weighted odds ratio, 95% confidence interval = 2.1, 1.7–2.5), suicidal ideation (1.7, 1.3–2.1), and suicide planning (1.5, 1.1–1.9).

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