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David Margolis, M.D. - UNC-Chapel Hill. Chapel Hill, NC, US

David Margolis, M.D. David Margolis, M.D.

Director, UNC HIV Cure Center | UNC-Chapel Hill

Chapel Hill, NC, UNITED STATES

Dr. Margolis is the leader of CARE: The Collaboratory of AIDS Researchers for Eradication. CARE is a New Vision for HIV Research.

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David Margolis of UNC discusses new HIV strain

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Biography

Dr. Margolis is the leader of CARE: The Collaboratory of AIDS Researchers for Eradication. CARE is a New Vision for HIV Research. CARE aims to do what no single laboratory or company can do: pursue a comprehensive collaborative search for approaches to eradicate HIV. CARE brings together some of the leading minds from top U.S. academic institutions in the field of HIV latency as well as the pharmaceutical industry in a joint consortium whose mission is to find a cure for HIV. By working together and leveraging research and resources across this consortium, the Collaboratory gives members access to technologies and tools to accelerate the work of finding a cure. CARE's efforts honor Martin Delaney, a pioneer in the field of HIV research and activism. This collaboration, much like his life's work, will bring cutting edge technology and the collaborative research endeavors of the leaders in the field of HIV research together to accelerate the development and dissemination of promising new HIV treatments. For more information, please visit www.delaneycare.org.

Industry Expertise (2)

Education/Learning

Research

Areas of Expertise (4)

Immunology

Epidemiology

HIV / AIDS

Hiv Research

Education (1)

Tufts University: M.D. Degree, Medicine

Media Appearances (1)

GSK, UNC partner to find AIDS cure

The News & Observer  online

2015-05-10

UNC is also home to one of the world’s leading researchers of this experimental technique, David Margolis, a professor in the School of Medicine. Margolis is the principal investigator of the NIH consortium. “Efforts toward a cure will be less often marked by breakthroughs than by incremental advances,” Margolis wrote in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses this year. “Eventually therapies may bear little resemblance to what is currently being tested or considered.”

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