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Dexter  Gabriel, Ph.D. - University of Connecticut. Storrs, CT, US

Dexter Gabriel, Ph.D. Dexter  Gabriel, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of History | University of Connecticut

Storrs, CT, UNITED STATES

Dexter Gabriel's research interests include the history of bondage, resistance, and freedom in the Black Atlantic.

Biography

Dr. Dexter Gabriel earned his B.A. in history from Texas State University-San Marcos, an M.A. in history also from Texas State University-San Marcos, and his Ph.D. in history from Stony Brook University-New York. His research interests include the history of bondage, resistance, and freedom in the Black Atlantic, as well as interdisciplinary approaches to slavery within popular culture and media. His current research explores British Emancipation in the Anglo-Caribbean and its impact on abolitionist strategies in nineteenth-century North America. His work has been translated into the social arena through panel discussions, lectures, articles, and interviews as diverse as the Federal Reserve Bank of Virginia to Voice of America, BBC America, and elsewhere.

Areas of Expertise (4)

Abolition and Emancipation

Slavery in Popular Culture

Slavery

Black Atlantic

Education (3)

Stony Brook University-New York: Ph.D., History

Texas State University-San Marcos: M.A., History

Texas State University-San Marcos: B.A., History

Media

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Dexter  Gabriel, Ph.D. Publication

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Media Appearances (4)

To John F. Kelly: Read this before you utter another word about the Civil War

The Washington Post  

2017-10-31

Clearly some lessons in African American history are needed. Here is a short reading list, from Dexter Gabriel, an assistant professor in the history department at the University of Connecticut, who has a joint faculty appointment with the Africana Studies Institute. His research interests include the history of bondage, resistance and freedom in the “Black Atlantic,” as well as interdisciplinary approaches to slavery within popular culture and media...

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The Trump administration has a lot to learn about African American history. Here’s a reading list.

The Washington Post  

2017-03-07

Clearly some lessons in African American history are needed. Here is a short reading list, from Dexter Gabriel, an assistant professor in the Department of History at the University of Connecticut, who has a joint faculty appointment with the Africana Studies Institute. His research interests include the history of bondage, resistance, and freedom in the “Black Atlantic,” as well as interdisciplinary approaches to slavery within popular culture and media...

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Blood on the leaves

The Economist  

2016-10-08

As Dexter Gabriel of the University of Connecticut says, cinematic slavery tends to reveal more about the filmmakers’ era than the antebellum one. He notes that today’s interest in rebel slaves, also manifest in the TV drama “Underground” and a slew of novels and plays, echoes that of the late 1960s and early 1970s, another period of black activism...

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'12 Years a Slave' Seen as Turning Point in Films on Slavery

Voice Of America  

2013-11-12

Film historian Dexter Gabriel says the movie breaks new ground.

“The movie does a very good job in exposing slavery, almost, in a sense, exposing the old films on slavery, the old plantation epics, exposing them for frauds," he said.

Gabriel says movies like Gone with the Wind, in 1939, did a disservice because they painted a portrait of slaves living in harmony with their owners.

Nostalgic tributes faded after the U.S. civil rights movement.

In 1977, the TV miniseries Roots became the first attempt to reveal the brutality of slavery. But Gabriel says slavery was a small part of the story that looked at the African American experience as a whole...

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Articles (2)

A Voice for Trayvon Martin American Book Review

Dexter Gabriel

2016

The death of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin and the subsequent trial and acquittal of his admitted murderer, George Zimmerman, may be remembered by historians as the moment that defined a generation. President Barack Obama, in a rare reflection on race, called the shooting death a “tragedy” and claimed if he had a son, he would “look like Trayvon.” Mobilized black youth took to the streets in hoodies to march and stage sit-ins across the nation in what some called a new Civil Rights Movement. Three African-American women organizers, inspired by the sense of injustice at the outcome of the jury decision, began a hashtag called #blacklivesmatter that fast took on a life of its own.

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A West Indian Jubilee in America: British Emancipation and the American Abolition Movement State University of New York at Stony Brook

Dexter Gabriel

2016

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