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Diana Pineda - USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work. Los Angeles, CA, US

Diana Pineda Diana Pineda

Adjunct Lecturer | USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work

Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES

Program Director for the Welcoming Practices Consortium in schools with Military-Connected Students

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Diana Pineda Publication Diana Pineda Publication

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Biography

Diana Pineda, MHA, MSW, is the program director for the Welcoming Practices Consortium in schools with military-connected students. Previously she was the project manager for Building Capacity in Military-Connected Schools, based in San Diego. For the USC Center for Innovation and Research on Veterans & Military Families, she managed a project to educate and empower veterans and families through the use of technology.

She is co-author of several health research articles and co-author of The Pupil Personnel Guide for Supporting Students from Military Families. She has as years of experience in medical social work and mental health. As a clinical supervisor, she worked with several hospital and outpatient programs serving families experiencing depression and anxiety.

An adjunct lecturer teaching policy and macro practice in child, youth, and family services, she has also been a field instructor, supervising interns at a school based at Camp Pendleton, and she received training by Project FOCUS in school-based skill-building.

Pineda consults as a problem-solving therapy trainer.

She holds a psychology degree from the University of California, Irvine, and master’s degrees in social work and health administration from USC.

Education (3)

University of Southern California: MSW

University of Southern California: MHA

University of California: BA, Psychology

Areas of Expertise (6)

Problem-Solving Therapy Veterans and Military Families Social Work Mental Health Military Social Work Veterans in High Education

Industry Expertise (4)

Health Care - Services Health and Wellness Education/Learning Social Services

Social

Media Appearances (2)

App enables school districts to welcome youngsters from military families

USC News  online

2016-03-03

WelConnect, which helps educators offer programs for students and parents, could serve as a model to other areas.

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Military Social Work scores at baseball game

USC News  online

2013-06-27

Baseball fans not only enjoyed the Padres-Dodgers game played on June 22 in San Diego, but they also shared in showing appreciation for local military members and the hundreds of school principals, teachers, superintendents, military school liaison officers, universities and social workers serving military children and families.

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Articles & Publications (3)

Well-Being and Suicidal Ideation of Secondary School Students From Military Families Journal of Adolescent Health

D. Pineda, et al.

2014

The mental health of children is a primary public health concern; adolescents of military personnel may be at increased risk of experiencing poorer well-being overall and depressive symptoms specifically. These adolescents experience individual and intrafamilial stressors of parental deployment and reintegration, which are directly and indirectly associated with internalizing behaviors.

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Substance Use Among Military-Connected Youth: The California Healthy Kids Survey American Journal of Preventive Medicine

D. Pineda, et al.

2013

Young people in military-connected families may be exposed to deleterious stressors, related to family member deployment, that have been associated with externalizing behaviors such as substance use. Substance use predisposes youth to myriad health and social problems across the life span.

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Integrating Mental Health Screening and Abnormal Cancer Screening Follow-Up: An Intervention to Reach Low-Income Women Community Mental Health Journal

D. Pineda, et al.

2002

The results of implementing mental health screening within cancer screening and diagnostic programs serving low-income ethnic minority women are reported. Multi-phased screening for anxiety and depression was provided as part of structured health education and intensive case management services to improve abnormal mammogram or Pap test follow-up. Seven hundred fifty-three women were enrolled in the Screening Adherence Follow-up Program. Ten percent (n = 74) met criteria for depressive or anxiety disorder. Women with depressive or anxiety disorders were more likely to have cancer, significant psychosocial stress, fair or poor health status, a comorbid medical problem, and limitation in functional status. Forty-seven women with disorders were receiving no depression care.

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