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Dong Chen, Ph.D. - Loyola Marymount University. Los Angeles, CA, US

Dong Chen, Ph.D. Dong Chen, Ph.D.

Professor of International Business, College of Business Administration | Loyola Marymount University

Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES

Biography

You can contact Dong Chen at Dong.Chen@lmu.edu.

Dong Chen has been a management professor in the College of Business Administration since 2004 and has taught courses in strategic management, international business, global strategy, business simulation, and business in China. Chen has also taught at Tsinghua University and Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. He was a visiting researcher at Tsinghua Global Industry Institute, Samsung Economic Research Institute, and China Europe International Business School. Chen is a member of the Academy of Management, the Academy of International Business, the Strategic Management Society, and is a founding member of the International Association for Chinese Management Research.

Education (4)

Rutgers Business School: Ph.D., Management 2004

Renmin University of China: Ph.D., Postgraduate Studies 1999

Renmin University of China: MA, Graduate Studies 1996

Renmin University of China: B.A., Undergraduate Studies 1994

Social

Areas of Expertise (7)

International Business

Global Strategic Management

Business in China

International Joint Ventures

Strategic Alliances

Emerging Economics

Corporate Governance

Industry Expertise (3)

International Trade and Development

International Affairs

Education/Learning

Affiliations (4)

  • Academy of Management
  • Academy of International Business
  • Strategic Management Society
  • International Association for Chinese Management Research

Media Appearances (1)

2020 FDI Report Release Interactive Webinar

World Trade Center Los Angeles (WTCLA)  online

2020-05-27

A recent newsletter from LAEDC highlighted the WTCLA webinar on FDI post-Covid where Dong Chen was a panelist. His discussion can be found in the August issue of The Planning Report. https://www.planningreport.com/2020/08/11/wtcla-attracting-retaining-foreign-direct-investment-post-covid

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Articles (7)

A reversal theory in internationalization: Case of Korean jewelry inside China

Chinese Management Studies

2016-04-01

This paper aims to examine Korean jewelry manufacturers operating in China to assess the relationship between their perceptions of external risks and their intentions to relocate. The authors hypothesize that foreign firms finding risk in the current external environment are more likely to consider moving their facilities outside China. In particular, this paper explores whether firm performance and technological capability moderate the relationship between perceived external risk and relocation intentions.

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Effect of foreign ownership on cost of borrowing: Evidence from small- and medium-sized enterprises in China

International Small Business Journal

2014-09-01

This article draws upon a sample of more than 27,000 Chinese small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to explore whether and how foreign equity investment in local SMEs affects the cost of debt. The results show that foreign ownership lowers the cost of borrowing for Chinese SMEs, and that this effect is stronger in more developed provinces. These findings contribute to evidence regarding the halo effect of foreign direct investment in emerging markets. This study also expands pecking order theory by demonstrating the signalling effect of equity structure characteristics on debt financing.

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Biking for success: Lessons learned from China's competitive sectors

Leadership Excellence

2013-07-01

Not available online

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Asian American-founded ventures in Silicon Valley: Challenges, strategic partnership, and performance

Journal of Enterprising Culture

2010-12-01

This paper examines the performance of Silicon Valley ventures with Asian-American founding teams. We review some challenges faced by these ventures, compare their performance with that of other ventures, and analyze the impact of strategic partnerships on their performance. Our results indicate that firms founded by Asian American entrepreneurs tend to require more time to reach initial public offering (IPO) status than do other ventures in Silicon Valley. Our results further show that, despite needing this extra time, Asian American-founded ventures significantly outperformed their counterparts in 12-month post-IPO share price gain. This superior short-term post-IPO performance suggests that Asian American firms, particularly those that lacked relationships with U.S.-based strategic investors, might have been undervalued prior to and at IPO.

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Host-country policies and MNE management control in IJVs: Evidence from China

Journal of International Business Studies

2009-12-24

In international joint ventures (IJVs), partner firms exert three types of management control: output, process, and social. Since management control critically influences IJV success, it is essential to understand what factors drive the development of the control system.

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Improving sustainability: An international evolutionary framework

Journal of International Management

2009-06-01

As emerging markets develop, foreign firms are being viewed less and less as providers of capital and/or technology, and more as integral parts of society in general, with much greater responsibilities that stem largely from their multinational roles. Recognizing these pressures and the increasing interaction between multinationals and societal institutions, we first briefly review the literature on role, stakeholder, and institutional theories, to develop a framework to improve our understanding of multinational sustainability.

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Parent contribution and organizational control in international joint ventures

Strategic Management Journal

2009-06-04

Organizational control scholars have recently noted how control use is not singular in organizations, but rather, different types of control are used to achieve different purposes. In international joint ventures (IJVs), we suggest that output, process, and social control are exercised by both foreign and local parent firms. We then hypothesize that a parent firm's usage of these three control types is influenced by its resource contributions. Using a sample of IJVs in China, we find that property-based contribution is linked with output and process control, and knowledge-based contribution is related to process and social control. The results also show differences in control practices between foreign and local parent firms. The findings provide important implications for the design and implementation of control systems in IJVs.

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