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Dorothee C.E. Bakker - University of East Anglia. Norwich, , GB

Dorothee C.E. Bakker Dorothee C.E. Bakker

Associate Professor in Marine Biogeochemistry | University of East Anglia

Norwich, UNITED KINGDOM

Her interest is in the marine carbon cycle – and particularly the uptake of carbon dioxide by the oceans.

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Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas SOCAT with Dorothee Dr Dorothee Bakker (UEA) and Dr Kim Currie (NIWA) Let’s start the ocean data revolution in the Nordics!

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Biography

Dorothee Bakker is Associate Professor in Marine Biogeochemistry in the Centre for Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences in the School of Environmental Sciences at UEA. Her interest is in the marine carbon cycle – and particularly the uptake of carbon dioxide by the oceans. She leads an international synthesis project (SOCAT - Surface Ocean CO₂ Atlas) that is key for quantification of the uptake of carbon dioxide by the global oceans and feeds into the annual analysis of the Global Carbon Budget.

She works with the National Oceanography Centre to understand carbon transfer into the deep ocean west of southern Chile and to explore carbon inputs from UK rivers into the surrounding seas. She is also involved in studies on the interaction between sea ice and uptake of carbon dioxide by the polar oceans.

After an MSc in Soil Science, Dorothee’s PhD is on the uptake of carbon dioxide by the Atlantic and Southern Oceans, which she studied at the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research and onboard the RV Polarstern icebreaker research ship. She has also worked at LOCEAN (the Laboratory of Oceanography and Climatology) in France.

Areas of Expertise (5)

Oceanography

Air-sea interactions

Marine Biogeochemical Cycles

Carbonate Chemistry

Marine Biogeochemistry

Accomplishments (1)

Recognition for my contribution to the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) by the Surface Ocean Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS)

2015

Education (2)

University of Groningen: Ph.D. 1998

Wageningen Agricultural University: M.Sc., Soil Science 1991

Media Appearances (5)

Is This Stormy Sea A Climate Friend Or Foe?

OZY  online

2020-02-20

Landschützer happened to begin his doctorate at an opportune time for availability of ocean data. The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas, aka SOCAT, debuted in 2011, as he began his studies at the University of East Anglia. Dorothee Bakker, chair of the SOCAT initiative and one of Landschützer’s thesis advisers, says he distinguished himself by creating eye-catching graphs to go along with his research. “He’s clearly a very strong scientist, but he’s also very driven, very dedicated,” Bakker says. “He knows what he wants to do.”

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Satellites are key to monitoring global carbon dioxide levels

BioTechniques  online

2019-11-15

“Putting surface ocean carbon data together in the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas after carrying out quality checks has facilitated studies of the ocean carbon sink,” explained co-author Dorothee Bakker (University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK). “These studies are of critical importance as the oceans absorb a quarter of the carbon dioxide emissions from human activity.”

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UEA and British Antarctic Survey in largest ever polar expedition

Business Weekly  online

2019-09-23

Dr Dorothee Bakker of the Centre of Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, who is leading UEA's project, said: “Sea ice modulates carbon uptake by the polar oceans. MOSAiC will provide unique year-round observations of carbon transfer between the sea-ice covered Arctic Ocean, the sea ice and the overlying atmosphere. Elise's research will improve understanding and modelling of carbon uptake by the polar oceans.”

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Southern Ocean starts to absorb carbon again

Climate Home  online

2015-09-14

“The Southern Ocean behaves like a giant lung, breathing in and absorbing vast amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and releasing it later in the year,” says one of the team, Dorothee Bakker, research officer in the School of Environmental Sciences at the University of East Anglia, UK.

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Antarctic Ocean has increased its absorption of carbon dioxide

LiveMint  online

2015-09-11

“The seas around Antarctica absorb significantly more CO2 than they release. And importantly, they remove a large part of the CO2 that is put into the atmosphere by human activities such as burning fossil fuels," co-author Dorothee Bakker, of the University of East Anglia, said in a statement announcing the findings.

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Articles (11)

Global Carbon Budget 2021

Earth System Science Data

2021 Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere in a changing climate is critical to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe and synthesize data sets and methodology to quantify the five major components of the global carbon budget and their uncertainties.

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Uncertainties in eddy covariance air–sea CO2 flux measurements and implications for gas transfer velocity parameterisations

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

2021 Air–sea carbon dioxide (CO2) flux is often indirectly estimated by the bulk method using the air–sea difference in CO2 fugacity (ΔfCO2) and a parameterisation of the gas transfer velocity (K). Direct flux measurements by eddy covariance (EC) provide an independent reference for bulk flux estimates and are often used to study processes that drive K. However, inherent uncertainties in EC air–sea CO2 flux measurements from ships have not been well quantified and may confound analyses of K. This paper evaluates the uncertainties in EC CO2 fluxes from four cruises.

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Cold-water corals in the Subpolar North Atlantic Ocean exposed to aragonite undersaturation if the 2 °C global warming target is not met

Global and Planetary Change

2021 The net uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere is changing the ocean's chemical state. Such changes, commonly known as ocean acidification, include a reduction in pH and the carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−]), which in turn lowers oceanic saturation states (Ω) for calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals. The Ω values for aragonite (Ωaragonite; one of the main CaCO3 minerals formed by marine calcifying organisms) influence the calcification rate and geographic distribution of cold-water corals (CWCs), important for biodiversity.

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Air-Sea Gas Fluxes and Remineralization From a Novel Combination of pH and O2 Sensors on a Glider

Frontiers in Marine Scence

2021 Accurate, low-power sensors are needed to characterize biogeochemical variability on underwater glider missions. However, the needs for high accuracy and low power consumption can be difficult to achieve together. To overcome this difficulty, we integrated a novel sensor combination into a Seaglider, comprising a spectrophotometric lab-on-a-chip (LoC) pH sensor and a potentiometric pH sensor, in addition to the standard oxygen (O2) optode. The stable, but less frequent (every 10 min) LoC data were used to calibrate the high-resolution (1 s) potentiometric sensor measurements.

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Consistency and Challenges in the Ocean Carbon Sink Estimate for the Global Carbon Budget

Frontiers in Marine Science

2020 Based on the 2019 assessment of the Global Carbon Project, the ocean took up on average, 2.5 ± 0.6 PgC yr−1 or 23 ± 5% of the total anthropogenic CO2 emissions over the decade 2009–2018. This sink estimate is based on simulation results from global ocean biogeochemical models (GOBMs) and is compared to data-products based on observations of surface ocean pCO2 (partial pressure of CO2) accounting for the outgassing of river-derived CO2.

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Carbon on the Northwest European Shelf: Contemporary Budget and Future Influences

Frontiers in Marine Sciences

2020 A carbon budget for the northwest European continental shelf seas (NWES) was synthesized using available estimates for coastal, pelagic and benthic carbon stocks and flows. Key uncertainties were identified and the effect of future impacts on the carbon budget were assessed.

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Tracer Measurements in Growing Sea Ice Support Convective Gravity Drainage Parameterizations

JGR Oceans

2020 Gravity drainage is the dominant process redistributing solutes in growing sea ice. Modeling gravity drainage is therefore necessary to predict physical and biogeochemical variables in sea ice. We evaluate seven gravity drainage parameterizations, spanning the range of approaches in the literature, using tracer measurements in a sea ice growth experiment.

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Satellites will address critical science priorities for quantifying ocean carbon

Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

2020 The ability to routinely quantify global carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption by the oceans has become crucial: it provides a powerful constraint for establishing global and regional carbon (C) budgets, and enables identification of the ecological impacts and risks of this uptake on the marine environment.

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Tracer Measurements in Growing Sea Ice Support Convective Gravity Drainage Parameterizations

Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans

2020 Gravity drainage is the dominant process redistributing solutes in growing sea ice. Modeling gravity drainage is therefore necessary to predict physical and biogeochemical variables in sea ice. We evaluate seven gravity drainage parameterizations, spanning the range of approaches in the literature, using tracer measurements in a sea ice growth experiment.

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Marine Climate Change Impacts: Report Card 2020

Marine Climate Change Impacts Partnership

2020 The Report Card 2020 summarises the latest evidence from 26 topics regarding the physical, ecological, and social and economic impacts of climate change on UK coasts and seas. New topics for this year include oxygen, cultural heritage, and transport and infrastructure.

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Global Carbon Budget 2019

Earth System Science Data

2019 Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere – the “global carbon budget” – is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change.

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