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Efstathios Michaelides - Texas Christian University. Fort Worth, TX, US

Efstathios Michaelides Efstathios Michaelides

W.A. "Tex" Moncrief Jr. Founding Chair of Engineering | Texas Christian University

Fort Worth, TX, UNITED STATES

Professor Michaelides focuses on lifetime of fossil fuel resources, alternative energy, geothermal energy and nanofluids.

Biography

Professor Stathis Michaelides is currently the Tex Moncrief Chair of Engineering at Texas Christian University (TCU). Prior to this he was chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of Texas at San Antonio, where he also held the Robert F. McDermott Chair in Engineering and was the Founder and Director of the NSF-supported Center on Simulation, Visualization and Real Time Computing (SiViRT). In the past he was the Founding Chair of the Department of Mechanical and Energy Engineering at the University of North Texas (2006-2007); the Leo S.Weil Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Tulane University (1998-2007); Director of the South-Central Center of the National Institute for Global Environmental Change (2002-2007); Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research in the School of Engineering at Tulane University (1992-2003); Head of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Tulane (1990-1992). Between 1980 and 1989 he was on the faculty of the University of Delaware, where he also served as Acting Chair of the Mechanical Engineering Department (1985-1987).

Professor Michaelides holds a B.A. degree (honors) from Oxford University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Brown University. He was awarded an honorary M.A. degree from Oxford University (1983); the Casberg and Schillizzi Scholarships at St. Johns College, Oxford; the student chapter ASME/Phi,Beta,Tau excellence in teaching award (1991 and 2001); the Lee H. Johnson award for teaching excellence (1995); a Senior Fulbright Fellowship (1997); the ASME Freeman Scholar award (2002); the Outstanding Researcher award at Tulane (2003); the ASME Outstanding Service award (2007); the ASME Fluids engineering award (2014); and the ASME 90th Anniversary of FED Medal, 2016.

Professor Michaelides was a member of the executive committee of the Fluids Engineering Division of the ASME (2002-08) and served as chair of the Division in 2005-2006. Prior to this he has served as chair (1996-1998) of the Multiphase Flow Technical Committee. He served as the President of the ASEE Gulf-South Region (1992-93). He chaired the 4th International Conference on Multiphase Flows (New Orleans May 27 to June 1, 2001) and was the vice-chair of the 5th International Conference on Multiphase Flows, (Yokohama, Japan May 2004). He has published more than 140 journal papers and has contributed more than 240 papers and presentations in national and international conferences.

Areas of Expertise (6)

Multiphase Flow

Nanofluids

Alternative Energy

Fossil Fuels

Geothermal Energy

Particulate Heat Transfer

Education (3)

Brown University: Ph.D.

Brown University: M.S.

Oxford University: B.A.

Affiliations (2)

  • The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) : Member
  • ASME : Chairman, Fluids Engineering Division, 2005 - 2007

Articles (6)

Making Texas green Mechanical Engineering

Efstathios E Michaelides

2019 It is technically possible to run the state's electrical grid using wing, solar, and nuclear power, but it will require a lot of energy storage...

The transient equation of motion for particles, bubbles, and droplets Journal of Fluids Engineering

Efstathios E Michaelides

2007 The development, form, and engineering applications of the transient equation of motion of rigid particles, bubbles, and droplets are presented. Some of the early work on the equation of motion, as well as recent advances, are exposed. Particular emphasis is placed on the semiempirical forms of the equation, which are widely used in engineering practice...

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Proteus: a direct forcing method in the simulations of particulate flows Journal of Computational Physics

Zhi-Gang Feng, Efstathios E Michaelides

2005 A new and efficient direct numerical method for the simulation of particulate flows is introduced. The method combines desired elements of the immersed boundary method, the direct forcing method and the lattice Boltzmann method. Adding a forcing term in the momentum equation enforces the no-slip condition on the boundary of a moving particle...

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The immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for solving fluid–particles interaction problems Journal of Computational Physics

Zhi-Gang Feng, Efstathios E Michaelides

2004 A new computational method, the immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method, is presented. This method is a combination and utilizes the most desirable features of the lattice Boltzmann and the immersed boundary methods. The method uses a regular Eulerian grid for the flow domain and a Lagrangian grid to follow particles that are contained in the flow field...

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Drag coefficients of irregularly shaped particles Powder Technology

Sabine Tran-Cong, Michael Gay, Efstathios E Michaelides

2004 The steady-state free-fall conditions of isolated groups of ordered packed spheres moving through Newtonian fluids have been studied experimentally. Measurements of the drag coefficients are reported in this paper for six different geometrical shapes, including isometric, axisymmetric, orthotropic, plane and elongated conglomerates of spheres. From these measurements, a new and accurate empirical correlation for the drag coefficient, CD, of variously shaped particles has been developed. This correlation has been formulated in terms of the Reynolds number based on the particle nominal diameter, Re, the ratio of the surface-equivalent-sphere to the nominal diameters, dA/dn, and the particle circularity, c. The predictions have been tested against both the experimental data for CD collected in this study and the ones reported in previous works for cubes, rectangular parallelepipeds, tetrahedrons, cylinders and …

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The transient equation of motion for particles, bubbles, and droplets Journal of Fluids Engineering

Efstathios E Michaelides

1997 The development, form, and engineering applications of the transient equation of motion of rigid particles, bubbles, and droplets are presented. Some of the early work on the equation of motion, as well as recent advances, are exposed. Particular emphasis is placed on the semiempirical forms of the equation, which are widely used in engineering practice. The creeping flow assumption, on which most of the known applications are based, is critically examined and its limitations are pointed out. Recent results on particle flow, which include the effect of the advection of a downstream wake and are applicable to finite (but small) Reynolds numbers are also presented. The form of the history (Basset) term is discussed, in the light of recent work and its effect on the integrated results of the equation of motion is examined. Recommendations are given on the appearance, importance, and significance of the history and …

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