hero image
Jason James - University of Mary Washington. Fredericksburg, VA, US

Jason James Jason James

Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology | University of Mary Washington

Fredericksburg, VA, UNITED STATES

Jason James' research comes out of a fascination and dismay at the power of collective identities with nations, ethnic groups, and "races."

Spotlight

Media

Publications:

Documents:

Photos:

loading image

Videos:

Audio:

Social

Biography

Jason James received his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of California, San Diego. His research interests include nationalism, ethnicity, collective memory, socialism and post-socialism, and Germany. He teaches courses in collective memory, the anthropology of Europe, urban anthropology, and tourism. His book, "Preservation and National Belonging in Eastern Germany: Heritage Fetishism and Redeeming Germanness," was published by Palgrave-Macmillan in 2012.

James' research comes out of a combination of fascination and dismay at the power of collective identities with nations, ethnic groups, and "races" — and how those identities are formed and mobilized in response to perceived Others and the dangers they are thought to pose. He is also interested in the social, cultural, and political dimensions of transportation.

Areas of Expertise (7)

Political Science Anthropology Sociology German Studies Nationalism Tourism Ethnicity

Education (2)

University of California, San Diego: Ph.D., Anthropology 2001

Boston University: B.A., Philosophy and Political Theory 1989

Media Appearances (2)

Radio Show Features UMW Anthropology Professor

UMW News  online

2012-11-30

Jason James, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Mary Washington, discusses the cultural struggles that persist in post-Nazi Germany during an interview scheduled to air on the “With Good Reason” public radio program ...

view more

Jason James Publishes Chapter in Volume on East German Cities

EagleEye  online

2015-01-13

Jason James, Associate Professor of Anthropology, contributed a chapter titled “Restoration and Redemption: Defending Kultur and Heimat in Eisenach’s Cityscape” to a new collected volume on East German cities ...

view more

Articles (4)

Preservation and National Belonging in Eastern Germany: Heritage Fetishism and Redeeming Germanness Palgrave Macmillan

2012-10-01

Drawing on cultural anthropology and cultural studies, this book sheds new light on the everyday politics of heritage and memory by illuminating local, everyday engagements with Germanness through heritage fetishism, claims to hometown belonging, and the performative appropriation of cultural property.

view more

Retrieving a Redemptive Past: Protecting Heritage and Heimat in East German Cities German Politics & Society

2009-09-01

In the years following unification, East German cityscapes have been subject to fierce contention because historic preservation and urban renewal have served as a local allegory of national redemption. Using conflicts over preservation and renewal in the city of Eisenach as a case study, I argue that historic cityscapes have served as the focus of many East Germans' efforts to grapple with the problem of Germanness because they address the past as a material cultural legacy to be retrieved and protected, rather than as a past to be worked through.

view more

Undoing Trauma: Reconstructing the Church of Our Lady in Dresden Ethos

2006-06-01

This article is an examination of the recent reconstruction of the Church of Our Lady (Frauenkirche) in Dresden, Germany, in relation to a desire for normalcy, which in this case finds expression in a fantasy of resurrection. The reconstruction of a monumental edifice framed as a victim of World War II and socialism both depends on and enacts the fantasy that historical loss can be undone.

view more

Recovering the German Nation: Heritage Restoration and the Search for Unity Alta Mira Press

2004-01-01

In "Marketing Heritage: Archaeology and the Consumption of the Past." Edited by Uzi Baram and Yorke Rowan.

view more

Contact