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Jongyeon (Joy)  Ee - Loyola Marymount University. Los Angeles, CA, US

Jongyeon (Joy) Ee Jongyeon (Joy)  Ee

Assistant Professor | Loyola Marymount University

Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES

Department of Teaching and Learning

Biography

Jongyeon (Joy) Ee received her Ph.D. in Education from University of California, Los Angeles. She was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the UCLA Civil Rights Project. She has authored several research reports and book chapters on school segregation, racial inequality, and school discipline in K-12 schools. Her recent work also focuses on education for language-minority students and immigrant students. She has published her work on dual immersion education and bilingualism in multiple research articles. She was awarded the Outstanding Dissertation Award from the National Association for Bilingual Education. She earned an MA degree in the Teaching of English as a Second Language at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and received a B.A. in English from South Korea.

Education (2)

University of California, Los Angeles: Ph.D., Education 2015

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: MA, Teaching English as an International Language 2010

Areas of Expertise (4)

School Segregation Educational Inequality Education for English Language Learners (ELLs) Dual Language Education

Accomplishments (1)

Outstanding Dissertation Award (professional)

2016-03-04

Received the outstanding dissertation award from National Association for Bilingual Education

Affiliations (1)

  • American Education Research Association

Articles (2)

Two dimensions of parental involvement: What affects parental involvement in dual language immersion? The Journal of the National Association for Bilingual Education

Jongyeon Ee

2017-04-07

This article investigates parental involvement in Korean two-way immersion (TWI) programs from the social capital theory perspective. This study explores the degree to which parental involvement is affected by parents’ demographic features and parent-related variables by analyzing data from 454 parents of students enrolled in seven elementary schools; the majority of parents and students in these schools are from immigrant families with different linguistic and cultural values. The findings reveal two dimensions of parental involvement activities: personal interactions among parents regarding their children’s education and parental participation in school. The results of a series of regression analyses indicate that the impact of social capital-related features on parental school engagement is modest. Parental interaction and participation are positively associated with each other; positive school environment is another salient factor in predicting parental involvement. The study’s findings provide insights regarding empirical evidence on parental practices in TWI and call for discussions and further research.

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Exploring Korean dual language immersion programs in the United States: parents’ reasons for enrolling their children International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism

Jongyeon Ee

2016-07-14

This study explores parents’ reasons for enrolling their children in a Korean dual language immersion (KDLI) program. The research focuses on parents’ reasons for choosing a school and a KDLI program, respectively, to examine whether a KDLI offering significantly affects parents’ decision to enroll their children in a specific school and to investigate which factors parents tend to prioritize when selecting a KDLI program over other language immersion programs. Given the various contexts in which individual KDLI programs operate, this study also compares different parent groups characterized by Korean ethnicity and school characteristics in terms of their responses. The study surveys more than 450 parents of students enrolled in 7 elementary-level KDLI programs in southern California to determine the extent to which parents’ reasons vary across different groups and examine whether group differences exist between Korean and non-Korean parents as well as between parents whose children attend high socioeconomic and low socioeconomic status schools. The study discusses the findings by comparing the results to prior literature and identifies implications for KDLI and DLI programs in general.

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