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Justin O'Grady - University of East Anglia. Norwich, , GB

Justin O'Grady Justin O'Grady

Associate Professor in Medical Microbiology | University of East Anglia

Norwich, UNITED KINGDOM

His research is into the rapid detection of infections, particularly respiratory infections such as Tuberculosis and Pneumonia.

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Look out for the pie-chart map...genuinely fascinating (..he says about his own report)

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Biography

Justin O’Grady is Associate Professor in Medical Microbiology in the Norwich Medical School, UEA. His research is into the rapid detection of infections, particularly respiratory infections such as Tuberculosis and Pneumonia. He uses innovative sequencing technologies to detect pathogens in human samples. He is currently focusing on the COVID19 virus: sequencing the coronavirus genome directly from human samples; looking for bacterial and fungal secondary infections in COVID19 patients; and performing rapid diagnosis of the coronavirus virus though live testing with patients.

Justin has worked in China and Africa – and was a research assistant at the University of Sydney. He is the Managing Editor of Biomolecular Detection and Quantification. He is also an expert panel member for the EU’s review on next generation sequencing to address antimicrobial resistance. He has been awarded a THE Award for International Partnership of the Year.

Areas of Expertise (5)

Detection of Pneumonia

Respiratory Infections

Microbiology

Medical Microbiology

Detection of Tuberculosis

Accomplishments (3)

Shortlisted for UEA Impact and Innovation Awards

2020

Winner of Lab of the Year at the UK Diagnostics Summit

2019

Winner, Times Higher Education Award for International Collaboration of the Year for the ADAT project

2013

Education (3)

National University of Ireland, Galway: Ph.D., Microbiology 2007

National University of Ireland, Galway: M.Sc., Microbiology 2000

National University of Ireland, Galway: B.Sc., Microbiology 1998

Media Appearances (5)

'New portable COVID-19 test can give results in 50 minutes'

Economic Times  online

2020-03-26

"The idea behind this is that we need to test NHS staff more quickly, so they can stay at work if they are well, or go home if they're a risk to potentially very vulnerable patients," said lead researcher Justin O'Grady, from UEA's Norwich Medical School, which began work on the kit earlier this month.

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ICMR invites quotations from manufacturers for supply of COVID-19 test kits

Business Standard  online

2020-03-26

"The idea behind this is that we need to test NHS staff more quickly, so they can stay at work if they are well, or go home if they're a risk to potentially very vulnerable patients," said lead researcher Justin O'Grady, from UEA's Norwich Medical School, which began work on the kit earlier this month.

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UEA researchers launch new project to 3D print ventilator parts and masks

News-Medical.net  online

2020-03-23

Dr. Justin O’Grady, from UEA’s Norwich Medical School, is pioneering a portable coronavirus kit which could be rolled out to test NHS staff in weeks. The test would provide a result, displayed on a smartphone, in just 50 minutes after taking a throat swab.

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Portable coronavirus kit to test NHS staff "available in weeks", says Norwich scientist

ITV News  online

2020-03-20

Dr Justin O'Grady, research group leader at the Quadram Institute in Norwich, said the test kit aims to help self-isolating medical staff return to work as quickly as possible. Also, he said the tool will ensure those at work are not spreading the virus.

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Hope for faster treatment of urinary tract infections

BBC News  online

2015-09-19

The device can also detect resistance to antibiotics, said Dr Justin O'Grady, also from UEA's Norwich Medical School. "Swift results like these will make it possible to refine a patient's treatment much earlier - and that's good for the patient, who gets the 'right' antibiotic, and for society - which can better manage or 'steward' its limited supply of antibiotics," he said.

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Event Appearances (5)

“Meet the Experts” session

ECCMID - 2019  Amsterdeam, Netherlands

qPCR, dPCR and NGS Conference

2019  Munich, Germany

Oxford Nanopore London Calling conference

2017  London, U.K.

Oxford Nanopore Users Meeting

2017  New York, USA

AMR Conference

ISAAR & ICIC - 2017  Busan, South Korea

Articles (5)

Geographical and temporal distribution of SARS-CoV-2 clades in the WHO European Region, January to June 2020

Eurosurveillance

2020 We show the distribution of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) genetic clades over time and between countries and outline potential genomic surveillance objectives. We applied three genomic nomenclature systems to all sequence data from the World Health Organization European Region available until 10 July 2020.

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Non-human primates in the Gambia harbour human-associated pathogenic Escherichia coli strains

Access Microbiology

2020 Increasing contact between humans and non-human primates provides an opportunity for the transfer of potential pathogens or antimicrobial resistance between different host species. We have investigated genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from a range of non-human primates dispersed across the Gambia: patas monkey (n=1), western colobus monkey (n=6), green monkey (n=14) and guinea baboon (n=22).

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An integrated national scale SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance network

The Lancet Microbe

2020 The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Genomics UK Consortium (COG-UK) was launched in March, 2020, with £20 million support from UK Research and Innovation, the UK Department of Health and Social Care, and Wellcome Trust.

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Metagenomic analysis of planktonic riverine microbial consortia using nanopore sequencing reveals insight into river microbe taxonomy and function

GigaScience

2020 Riverine ecosystems are biogeochemical powerhouses driven largely by microbial communities that inhabit water columns and sediments. Because rivers are used extensively for anthropogenic purposes (drinking water, recreation, agriculture, and industry), it is essential to understand how these activities affect the composition of river microbial consortia.

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Rapid and Point of Care Testing (POCT) in Respiratory Tract Infections: An Antibiotic Guardian?

ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science

2020 This is a narrative review on the potential of rapid and point-of-care microbiological testing in pneumonia patients, focusing particularly on hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated pneumonia, which have substantial mortality and diverse microbiology. It is written from a UK perspective, but much is generalizable internationally.

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