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Mathijs De Vaan - Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley. Berkeley, CA, US

Mathijs De Vaan Mathijs De Vaan

Assistant Professor | Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley

Berkeley, CA, UNITED STATES

Leading expert on social networks in health care

Social

Areas of Expertise (4)

Network Analysis

Health Care Management

Economic Sociology

Research Design and Methods

About

Mathijs De Vaan is an Assistant Professor at the Haas School of Business. He earned his PhD from the Department of Sociology at Columbia University after defending his dissertation in June 2015.

Mathijs’ main research agenda focuses on social networks in health care. Motivated by the high level of variation in the cost and quality of care, Mathijs’ research examines the role of relationships between patients, between physicians, and between patients and physicians in the emergence and persistence of this variation. A second line of inquiry focuses on inequality in the production of science.

Education (5)

Columbia University: PhD, Sociology

Columbia University: MPhil, Sociology

Utrecht University: PhD, Economics/Geography

Utrecht University: MA, Economics

Utrecht University: BA, Economics

Languages (4)

  • Dutch (Native)
  • English (Fluent)
  • French (Intermediate)
  • German (Intermediate)

Positions Held (1)

At Haas since 2015

2015 – present, Assistant Professor, Haas School of Business

Media Appearances (3)

UC Berkeley Researchers: Opioid Addiction Is A Family Affair

KCBS Radio  radio

2019-08-02

Researchers Toby Stuart and Mathijs de Vaan of Berkeley Haas have uncovered another possible reason the opioid crisis has gotten so bad in the U.S.: family connections.

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Is the Opioid Epidemic Driven By Family Consumption?

The Crime Report  online

2019-07-19

The study, conducted by Mathijs de Vaan and Toby Stuart, sociologists at the Haas School of Business of the University of California at Berkeley, found that if one family member uses prescription opioids, it’s likely that others in the family will soon be using them, too. The researchers analyzed hundreds of millions of medical claims and nearly 14.5 million opioid prescriptions in Massachusetts between 2010 and 2015.

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CEO's salaries are best compared to peers. But how do you prevent cheating?

MT: Next Generation Leadership (Dutch)  online

2019-06-07

Research by Asst. Prof. Mathijs De Vaan found that a rule designed to make executive compensation more transparent has also given companies a tool to push CEO pay even higher. Companies are required to benchmark CEO pay against execs at peer companies, but they commonly choose peers that are skewed toward the higher end on compensation. "You would think that these peer groups ensure that a salary cannot become excessive compared to other CEOs," said De Vaan. "But the point is that it is not very easy to determine what such a peer groups should look like."

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Selected Papers & Publications (7)

Does Intra-household Contagion Cause an Increase in Prescription Opioid Use? American Sociological Review

Mathijs de Vaan and Toby Stuart

June 2019

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Obscured Transparency? Compensation Benchmarking and the Biasing of Executive Pay Management Science

De Vaan, M., Elbers, B. and DiPrete, T.

2019

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The Matthew Effect in Science Funding Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Thijs Bol, Mathijs De Vaan, Arnout van de Rijt

2018

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Game Changer: The Topology of Creativity American Journal of Sociology

Mathijs De Vaan, David Stark, Balazs Vedres

2015

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Interfirm Networks in Periods of Technological Turbulence and Stability Research Policy

Mathijs De Vaan

2014

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Clustering and Firm Performance in Project-based Industries The Journal of Economic Geography

Mathijs De Vaan, Ron Boschma, and Koen Frenken

2012

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The Dynamics of Interfirm Networks along the Industry Life Cycle The Journal of Economic Geography

Pierre-Alexandre Balland, Mathijs De Vaan, and Ron Boschma

2013

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Teaching (2)

Leading People

MBA Core Course

Research in Macro-Organizational Behavior

PhD Seminar