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Matthew Hoffman, M.D., MPH - ChristianaCare. Newark, DE, US

Matthew Hoffman, M.D., MPH Matthew Hoffman, M.D., MPH

Marie E. Pinizzotto, M.D., Endowed Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology | ChristianaCare

Newark, DE, UNITED STATES

Dr. Matthew Hoffman has spearheaded national improvements in OB/GYN care and frequently speaks to the media about OB/GYN trends.

Biography

Dr. Matthew K. Hoffman has spearheaded national improvements in OB/GYN care and frequently speaks to the media about OB/GYN trends.

He is the Marie E. Pinizzotto, M.D., Endowed Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology for ChristianaCare.

Since joining ChristianaCare in 1995, Dr. Hoffman has helped guide the Department and the health system to provide greater quality and value. He has served as vice chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Division of Education and Research since 2011.

He frequently lectures on women’s health issues, including domestic violence, pediatric gynecology, and obstetrical emergencies. He is also a reviewer for several medical journals in his field, including Obstetrics & Gynecology and the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Areas of Expertise (4)

Preterm Birth

Global Health

Labor Complications

Digital Outreach

Education (3)

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health: MPH, Public Health 1998

University of Florida: MD, Medicine 1991

Hershey Medical Center, Pennsylvania State University: B.S., Biochemistry 1991

Multimedia

Publications:

Documents:

Photos:

Videos:

Having a Healthy Pregnancy During the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Audio:

Media Appearances (3)

A Daily Aspirin for Pregnancy?

The New York Times  print

2020-02-11

Matthew K. Hoffman, chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at ChristianaCare in Newark, Del., said that early preterm birth is driven by...

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Exclusive look inside ChristianaCare's new state-of-the-art center for women, children

6ABC  tv

2020-05-05

BABY Exclusive look inside ChristianaCare's new state-of-the-art center for women, children By Ashley Johnson NEWARK, Delaware (WPVI) -- Action News got an exclusive look inside the new Center for Women's and Children's Health at ChristianaCare Hospital in Newark, Delaware. "It's kind of like you're in a resort so to say. Everything is so fancy and new," said mom, Briana Thompkins. This state-of-the-art facility opened in the midst of the pandemic and has been several years in the making. What makes it so special is the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) couplet model, where moms and newborns can stay in the same room. In most hospitals, they're separated. Twins Gianna and Roni were the first in the new NICU. "It's nice I can even be here, spend time with them and obviously they're still so little, but it's great I can even be a presence in the room," said the new mom of twins, Janet Roth. Doctors say that initial bonding time for mom and baby is crucial. ChristianaCare is busy when it comes to babies. Doctors say they deliver the most babies out of any hospital in the tri-state. About 6,000 babies are born each year here. "What's really important is how we care for you before you come here, while you're here and then after you go home," CEO Janice Nevin said. "We've already started to see the smiles on our patients. We've only been open for two weeks and we've already heard the positive reviews from our families," Dr. Matthew Hoffman said.

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Family driving factor behind ChristianaCare's new women and children center

Delawareonline.com / The News Journal  

There was something different about this birth for Katie and Brian Rubin. Yes, their second child, Emma, was born on May 5 amid a pandemic. But the other difference the Rubins noticed was ChristianaCare's new Center for Women's and Children's Health. Their first daughter, Hannah, was born two years ago in the hospital's old building. "Great experience last time as well," said Katie Rubin, as she kept an eye on her newborn. "The main thing this time, the rooms are a little bigger. It's a little bit easier to have Brian here. "It's nicer to have him here to help with everything." That family convenience is what ChristianaCare had in mind when it started the project, which has been nearly three years in the making. It had its soft opening during the last week of April – and on schedule. The labor rooms are also 50% larger and the postpartum rooms have more space for visitors, including a couch that with a touch of a button either turns into a bed or a table pops out of it. "We built this with the idea of serving the community," said Dr. Matthew Hoffman, the Marie E. Pinizzotto, M.D., Endowed Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology at ChristianaCare. "Our rates aren't changing in any particular way. It's really to better help serve the community and part of the commitment to the community." ChristianaCare is one of the busiest birthing hospitals in the region. About 6,000 babies are born there every year. The eight-story building is more than a medical facility. It also serves as a place where families can come together in a hopefully less stressful environment, hospital officials said. Helping provide a more relaxed theme are images of Delaware's estuary on the facility's walls. There also is a healing garden, with outdoor seating and landscaping designed for all seasons. This second-floor garden has room for strollers, children to play and plenty of family walking space. The labor rooms are also 50% larger and the postpartum rooms have more space for visitors, including a couch that with a touch of a button either turns into a bed or a table pops out of it. "We built this with the idea of serving the community," said Dr. Matthew Hoffman, the Marie E. Pinizzotto, M.D., Endowed Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology at ChristianaCare. "Our rates aren't changing in any particular way. It's really to better help serve the community and part of the commitment to the community."

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Selected Papers and Publications (6)

Preterm birth : can we do better?

Proceedings in Obstetrics and Gynecology

Scott A. Sulivan, Matt Hoffman, John Elliott

2016-12-01

Preterm birth (PTB) remains the most serious complication in obstetrics and a substantial excess burden in US healthcare economics. The etiology of PTB is complex and likely has multiple physiological pathways. Unfortunately, current antenatal care screening methods have not been successful in predicting and, eventually, preventing PTB.

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Racial/ethnic disparities in measures of self-reported psychosocial states and traits during pregnancy

American Journal of Perinatology

William A. Grobman, Corette Parker, Pathik D. Wadhwa, Marian Willinger, Hyagriv Simhan, Bob Silver, Ron J. Wapner, Samuel Parry, Brian Mercer, David Haas, Alan M. Peaceman, Shannon Hunter, Deborah Wing, Steve Caritis, Sean Esplin, Matt Hoffman, Jack Ludmir, Jay Iams, Emily Long, George Saade, Uma M. Reddy

2016-01-01

The aim of this study was to determine whether racial/ethnic differences in psychosocial measures, independent of economic status, exist among a large population of pregnant nulliparas.

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Low-dose aspirin for the prevention of preterm delivery in nulliparous women with a singleton pregnancy (ASPIRIN): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

The Lancet

Prof Matthew K Hoffman, MD Prof Shivaprasad S Goudar, MD Prof Bhalachandra S Kodkany, MD Prof Mrityunjay Metgud, MD Manjunath Somannavar, MD Jean Okitawutshu & more

2020-01-25

Preterm birth remains a common cause of neonatal mortality, with a disproportionately high burden in low-income and middle-income countries. Meta-analyses of low-dose aspirin to prevent pre-eclampsia suggest that the incidence of preterm birth might also be decreased, particularly if initiated before 16 weeks of gestation.

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A comparison of obstetric maneuvers for the acute management of shoulder dystocia

National Library of Medicine

Matthew K Hoffman, Jennifer L Bailit, D Ware Branch, Ronald T Burkman, Paul Van Veldhusien, Li Lu, Michelle A Kominiarek, Judith U Hibbard, Helain J Landy, Shoshana Haberman, Isabelle Wilkins, Victor H Gonzalez-Quintero, Kimberly D Gregory, Christos G Hatjis, Mildred M Ramirez, Uma M Reddy, James Troendle, Jun Zhang, Consortium on Safe Labor

2011-07-17

Abstract Objective: To assess the efficacy of obstetric maneuvers for resolving shoulder dystocia and the effect that these maneuvers have on neonatal injury when shoulder dystocia occurs.

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Length of the second stage of labor and preterm delivery risk in the subsequent pregnancy

National Library of Medicine

Joanne N Quiñones, Daniel Gómez, Matthew K Hoffman, Cande V Ananth, John C Smulian, Daniel W Skupski, Karin M Fuchs, William E Scorza, Perinatal Research Consortium

2018-08-28

Background: Cervical injury is regarded as an important risk factor for preterm delivery. A prolonged second stage of labor may increase the risk of cervical injury that, in turn, may be associated with increased risk of spontaneous preterm delivery in the subsequent pregnancy.

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Development and validation of a spontaneous preterm delivery predictor in asymptomatic women

National Library of Medicine

George R Saade, Kim A Boggess, Scott A Sullivan, Glenn R Markenson, Jay D Iams, Dean V Coonrod, Leonardo M Pereira, M Sean Esplin, Larry M Cousins, Garrett K Lam, Matthew K Hoffman, Robert D Severinsen, Trina Pugmire, Jeff S Flick, Angela C Fox, Amir J Lueth, Sharon R Rust, Emanuele Mazzola, ChienTing Hsu, Max T Dufford, Chad L Bradford, Ilia E Ichetovkin, Tracey C Fleischer, Ashoka D Polpitiya, Gregory C Critchfield, Paul E Kearney, J Jay Boniface, Durlin E Hickok

2016-02-11

Background: Preterm delivery remains the leading cause of perinatal mortality. Risk factors and biomarkers have traditionally failed to identify the majority of preterm deliveries. Objective: To develop and validate a mass spectrometry-based serum test to predict spontaneous preterm delivery in asymptomatic pregnant women.

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