hero image
Nadia Y. Kim - Loyola Marymount University. Los Angeles, CA, US

Nadia Y. Kim Nadia Y. Kim

Professor of Sociology | Loyola Marymount University

Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES

Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts

Media

Publications:

Nadia Y. Kim Publication

Documents:

Photos:

loading image loading image loading image

Videos:

Audio:

Biography

Nadia Y. Kim is the Professor of Sociology at Loyola Marymount University. She attended public schools, graduated magna cum laude at University of California-Santa Barbara (English and Sociology), and received her Ph.D. at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor where she was an American Sociological Association Minority Fellow. She was also a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at University of California-San Diego.

Her research focuses on transnational experiences of US race and citizenship inequalities among Korean/Asian Americans and South Koreans in (neo)imperial context; on race/gender/class intersectionality; on the body and citizenship for Asian Americans & Latinos; on South Korean society and ethnoraciality & gender; on Latino & Asian American children of immigrants; on immigrant community politics; and on cultural globalization.

Kim is author of Imperial Citizens: Koreans and Race from Seoul to LA (Stanford, 2008), an exploration of how immigrants navigate American race inequality and ideology (owing to US power abroad) not just after US arrival but before it, and through transnationally connecting both societies. Imperial Citizens won two American Sociological Association (ASA) awards in 2009: Book of the Year Award from the Asia and Asian America section and the Oliver Cromwell Cox Book Award from the Racial and Ethnic Minorities section. She also won two ASA Early Career Awards (one from each section) in part because of the book and and has won three top awards for single- and co-authored research articles from professional academic organizations.

Education (3)

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor: Ph.D., Sociology 2003

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor: A.M, Sociology 2000

University of California at Santa Barbara: A.B., English and Sociology 1996

Social

Areas of Expertise (18)

Migration

Immigration

Race and Ethnicity

Gender and Transnationality/Globalization

Race/Gender/Class Intersectionality

Immigrant Community Politics

Feminist Theory

Asian Pacific American History

Gender and Women's Studies

Social-Cultural Citizenship

Citizenship and the Body/Embodiment

Environmental Health Justice

Transnational Race Theorizing

Urban Community Politics

South Korea

Asian American Studies

Global Culture

Transnationalism

Accomplishments (17)

LMU Women's Basketball Team Honorary Coach (personal)

2016-2017, selected in recognition of teaching excellence

Nominee, Daum Professorship (professional)

2014 Nominee, Daum Professorship, Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts, Loyola Marymount University

Early Career Award, Section on Asia and Asian America (professional)

2012 Early Career Award, Section on Asia and Asian America, American Sociological Association

College Fellowship (professional)

2012 College Fellowship, Loyola Marymount University Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts (2 given college-wide)

Best Research Paper Award, Section on Asia and Asian America (professional)

2010 Best Research Paper Award, Section on Asia and Asian America, American Sociological Association

Oliver Cromwell Cox Book Award, Section on Racial and Ethnic Minorities (professional)

2009 Oliver Cromwell Cox Book Award, Section on Racial and Ethnic Minorities, American Sociological Association

Book of the Year Award, Section on Asia and Asian America (professional)

2009 Book of the Year Award, Section on Asia and Asian America, American Sociological Association

Early Career Award, Section on Racial and Ethnic Minorities (professional)

2009 Early Career Award, Section on Racial and Ethnic Minorities, American Sociological Association

Selected participant – International Migration Summer Institute (professional)

2005 Selected participant – International Migration Summer Institute, Social Science Research Council (at University of California-Irvine)

Honorable Mention, Distinguished Dissertation Award (professional)

2003 University of Michigan-Ann Arbor Distinguished Dissertation Award, Honorable Mention

Postdoctoral Visiting Research Fellow (professional)

2003-04 Postdoctoral Visiting Research Fellow – Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, University of California-San Diego

Predoctoral Fellow (professional)

2002-03 Predoctoral Fellow – Northeast Consortium Dissertation-in-Residence Fellowship Program

Sociologists for Women in Society Minority Scholar Award (professional)

2001-02 Sociologists for Women in Society Minority Scholar Award

First Place Award – Graduate Student Paper Competition (personal)

2000 First Place Award – Graduate Student Paper Competition, 30th Annual Association of Black Sociologists Conference, Washington D.C. (with T. Forman)

First Place Award – Graduate Student Paper Competition (personal)

2000 First Place Award – Graduate Student Paper Competition, 10th Annual Students of Color of Rackham Conference, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor (with T. Forman)

Fellow (professional)

1999-02 Fellow – American Sociological Association Minority Fellowship Program (General)

Honorable Mention (professional)

1999 Society for the Study of Social Problems Minority Fellowship – Honorable Mention

Affiliations (12)

  • Women's & Gender Studies (LMU)
  • Asian Pacific American Studies (LMU)
  • American Sociological Association
  • Association of Asian American Studies
  • American Studies Association
  • Sociologists for Women in Society
  • Pacific Sociological Association
  • Communities for a Better Environment
  • Coalition for a Safe Environment
  • People’s Core (Carson CA)
  • The Children’s Clinic (Long Beach CA)
  • Long Beach Alliance for Children with Asthma (Long Beach CA)

Languages (3)

  • English
  • Korean (advanced)
  • Spanish (basic)

Media Appearances (1)

LA Riots: After the smoke settled, blacks and Korean-Americans faced contrasting realities

KPCC  radio

2017-04-28

The animosity created by the Latasha Harlins shooting, combined with the arson and looting directed against Korean businesses 25 years ago, sparked a shift after the smoke cleared and the broken glass was swept away. But what changed after the riots in the Korean American and African American communities? Take Two put that question to Nadia Kim, professor of sociology at Loyola Marymount University, and Erin Aubry Kaplan, a journalist who has written extensively about the riots.

view more

Research Grants (3)

LMU Faculty Research and Writing Grant

Loyola Marymount University 

2017-2018

LMU Course Immersion Grant

Loyola Marymount University 

2017-2018

Faculty Research Fellowship

Thomas and Dorothy Leavey Center for the Study of Los Angeles 

Awarded for the project “Can’t We All Finally Get Along?: Race Relations in Los Angeles Twenty-Five Years After King”

view more

Courses (6)

Honors Program: American Persona

Honors Program: American Persona

Senior Capstone Seminar: Immigrants, Community & Environmental Politics

Senior Capstone Seminar: Immigrants, Community & Environmental Politics

Principles of Sociology

Principles of Sociology

Sociology of Immigration

Sociology of Immigration

Ethnic Communities / Race & Ethnic Relations

Ethnic Communities / Race & Ethnic Relations

Gender and Global Migration

Gender and Global Migration (course on global/transnational migration)

Articles (7)

Race-ing the Korean American Experience Chapter in Brill Companion in North Korean American Studies

Forthcoming. "Race-ing the Korean American Experience." Chapter in Brill Companion in North Korean American Studies, Shelley Lee and Rachel Joo, eds.

'Success is Relative': Comparative Social Class and Ethnic Effects in an Academic Paradox Sociologicical Perspectives

2016. "'Success is Relative': Comparative Social Class and Ethnic Effects in an Academic Paradox" (with Christine Oh). Sociologicical Perspectives 59(2):270-295.

Relocating Prejudice: A Transnational Approach to Understanding Immigrants’ Racial Attitudes International Migration Review

2013. “Relocating Prejudice: A Transnational Approach to Understanding Immigrants’ Racial Attitudes” (with Wendy D. Roth). International Migration Review 47(2):330-73.

Citizenship on the Margins: A Critique of Scholarship on Marginalized Women and Community Activism Sociology Compass

2013. “Citizenship on the Margins: A Critique of Scholarship on Marginalized Women and Community Activism.” Sociology Compass 7(6):459-70 (June). http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/soc4.12042/abstract

view more

Critical Thoughts on Asian American Assimilation in the Whitening Literature Racism in Post-Racism America: New Theories, New Directions

2008. “Critical Thoughts on Asian American Assimilation in the Whitening Literature.” Pp. 53-66 in Racism in Post-Racism America: New Theories, New Directions, edited by Charles A. Gallagher. Chapel Hill, NC: Social Forces.

A Return to More Blatant Class and ‘Race’ Bias in US Immigration Policy? The Du Bois Review

2008. “A Return to More Blatant Class and ‘Race’ Bias in US Immigration Policy?” The Du Bois Review 4(2):469-477.

See CV for complete list See CV for complete list

See CV for complete list