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Paige Edley - Loyola Marymount University. Los Angeles, CA, US

Paige Edley Paige Edley

Professor of Communication Studies | Loyola Marymount University

Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES

Professor of Communication Studies

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Biography

Dr. Edley teaches classes in organizational communication, gender and the workplace, corporate ethics and social responsibility, and qualitative research capstone. Her research interests include the intersections of power, gender, and identity in organizations, #METOO, rape culture, affirmative consent, alternative forms of organizing, feminist organizing, work-life balance, and women-owned businesses. She has published multiple book chapters and journal articles in such prestigious journals as Management Communication Quarterly, Communication Yearbook, Electronic Journal of Communication, Women and Language, Argumentation and Advocacy, etc.

In addition, Dr. Edley is committed to issues of social justice and tries to blend activism with her teaching and scholarship. She has participated in local, regional, and national protests of sexist, racist, and greedy organizational practices.

Education (3)

Rutgers University at New Brunswick: Ph.D., Communication 1997

Wake Forest University: M.A., Communication 1984

Wake Forest University: B.A., English

Social

Areas of Expertise (12)

Feminism American Politics Culture

Writing & Editing

Activism

Social Justice

Alternative Forms of Organization

Qualitative Research Methods

Corporate Social Responsibility

Social Responsibility

Corporate Ethics

Gender and the Workplace

Organizational Communication

Ethnography

Industry Expertise (5)

Writing and Editing

Education/Learning

Public Relations and Communications

Research

Non-Profit/Charitable

Accomplishments (1)

Wise Woman (professional)

2017-10-06

I was inducted into the Wise Woman Council of the Organization of Communication, Language, and Gender (OSCLG). I was selected by the Wise Women based on my leadership roles in OSCLG, (wo)mentoring of younger feminist scholars, and my feminist scholarly publications.

Affiliations (7)

  • Organization for the Study of Communication, Language, and Gender
  • Women & Language Review Board
  • Youth Drama Theater
  • The Shepherd's House
  • I Live Here
  • Rutgers University
  • Wake Forest University

Articles (5)

Democracy and Authority: Ethnographic Articulation and Interventions for Social Change Activism and Rhetoric: Theories and Contexts for Political Engagement

2011-04-27

This volume examines the role of rhetoric in today’s culture of democratic activism.

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Body image of dancers in Los Angeles: the cult of slenderness and media influence among dance students Research in Dance Education

2008-11-01

Body image and self‐esteem are examined through personal stories among Los Angeles college dancers who grew up in the Hollywood culture of the cult of slenderness.

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Stay-At-Home Fathers: Masculinity, Family, Work, and Gender Stereotypes The Electronic Journal of Communication

2006-01-01

This paper examines the stay-at-home father and how society responds to nontraditional gendered family roles.

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Discursive Essentializing in a Woman-Owned Business: Gendered Stereotypes and Strategic Subordination Management Communication Quarterly

1999-12-01

Illustrates how the cultural practice of discursive essentializing in a woman-owned and operated business accomplished simultaneous agendas of power and resistance.

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Discursive essentializing in a woman-owned business Management Communication Quarterly : McQ

Paige Edley

2000-11-14

The purpose of this project is to illustrate how the cultural practice of discursive essentializing in a woman-owned and operated business accomplished simultaneous agendas of power and resistance. Utilizing Foucault's (1980) conceptualization of power and resistance and Fuss's (1989) and Spivak's (1988) views of essentializing as apolitical move, the author illustrates how the performance of gendered stereotypes, rather than having expected negative consequences, allowed organizational members to suppress conflict and to reproduce the owners' concept of the ideal workplace for women.

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