hero image
David Vaillancourt - University of Florida. Gainesville, FL, US

David Vaillancourt David Vaillancourt

Professor | University of Florida

Gainesville, FL, UNITED STATES

Vaillancourt’s research focuses on how the brain regulates voluntary and involuntary movement with a specific focus on motor disorders.

Biography

Vaillancourt’s research focuses on how the brain regulates voluntary and involuntary movement with a specific focus on motor disorders. His research program uses advanced neuroimaging techniques to study the functional and structural changes in the brain of humans and animal models that span Parkinson’s disease, tremor, ataxia, and dystonia.

Industry Expertise (2)

Health and Wellness

Education/Learning

Areas of Expertise (5)

Structural and Functional Imaging in Rodents and Humans

Rehabilitative, Surgical and Pharmacological Interventions for Motor Disorders

Cortical Oscillations that Underlie Voluntary and Involuntary Movement

Neuroscience and the Brain

Progression Markers of Parkinson’s Disease

Media Appearances (5)

University neuro experts receive millions for MRI-based study into Parkinson’s

HealthImaging  online

2021-03-30

“The goal is that clinical trials will be better because they will focus on specific variants,” said co-principal investigator David Vaillancourt, PhD, chair of the UF College of Health & Human Performance’s Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology. "Patients will be able to know their diagnosis earlier.”

view more

New AI tool being tested in UF Health study to improve Parkison's diagnosis

Becker's Healthcare  online

2021-03-23

"This isn't going to replace the physician's decision-making; it's just meant to be another tool in their toolkit," David Vaillancourt, PhD, chair of UF's department of applied physiology and kinesiology and a principal investigator on the study, told UF Health. "The goal is that clinical trials will be better because they will focus on specific variants. Patients will be able to know their diagnosis earlier."

view more

Artificial Intelligence Tool Seeks to Enhance Parkinson’s Diagnosis

HealthITAnalytics  online

2021-03-22

“This isn’t going to replace the physician’s decision making; it’s just meant to be another tool in their toolkit,” said David Vaillancourt, PhD, professor and chair of the UF College of Health & Human Performance's department of applied physiology and kinesiology. “The goal is that clinical trials will be better because they will focus on specific variants. Patients will be able to know their diagnosis earlier.”

view more

Biomarker breakthrough could improve Parkinson’s treatment

UF News  online

2016-08-15

“Our technique does not rely upon the injection of a drug. Not only is it non-invasive, it’s much less expensive,” said David Vaillancourt, Ph.D., a professor in UF’s Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology and the study’s senior author.

view more

Researchers examine how Parkinson’s disease alters brain activity over time

PsyPost  online

2016-08-15

“If you know that in Parkinson’s disease the activity in a specific brain region is decreasing over the course of a year, it opens the door to evaluating a therapeutic to see if it can slow that reduction,” said senior author David Vaillancourt, Ph.D., a professor in the University of Florida’s Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology. “It provides a marker for evaluating how treatments alter the chronic changes in brain physiology caused by Parkinson’s.”

view more

Social

Articles (5)

Alteration of the cholinergic system and motor deficits in cholinergic neuron-specific Dyt1 knockout mice

Neurobiology of Disease

Dystonia is a neurological movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions, repetitive movement, and sometimes abnormal postures. DYT1 dystonia is one of the most common genetic dystonias, and most patients carry heterozygous DYT1 ∆GAG mutations causing a loss of a glutamic acid of the protein torsinA. Patients can be treated with anticholinergics, such as trihexyphenidyl, suggesting an abnormal cholinergic state.

view more

A Higher Order Manifold-Valued Convolutional Neural Network with Applications to Diffusion MRI Processing

International Conference on Information Processing in Medical Imaging

In this paper, we present a novel generalization of the Volterra Series, which can be viewed as a higher-order convolution, to manifold-valued functions. A special case of the manifold-valued Volterra Series (MVVS) gives us a natural extension of the ordinary convolution to manifold-valued functions that we call, the manifold-valued convolution (MVC). We prove that these generalizations preserve the equivariance properties of the Euclidean Volterra Series and the traditional convolution operator.

view more

Cell-specific effects of Dyt1 knock-out on sensory processing, network-level connectivity, and motor deficits

Experimental Neurology

DYT1 dystonia is a debilitating movement disorder characterized by repetitive, unintentional movements and postures. The disorder has been linked to mutation of the TOR1A/DYT1 gene encoding torsinA. Convergent evidence from studies in humans and animal models suggest that striatal medium spiny neurons and cholinergic neurons are important in DYT1 dystonia. What is not known is how torsinA dysfunction in these specific cell types contributes to the pathophysiology of DYT1 dystonia.

view more

Investigating the role of striatal dopamine receptor 2 in motor coordination and balance: Insights into the pathogenesis of DYT1 dystonia

Behavioural Brain Research

DYT1 or DYT-TOR1A dystonia is early-onset, generalized dystonia. Most DYT1 dystonia patients have a heterozygous trinucleotide GAG deletion in DYT1 or TOR1A gene, with a loss of a glutamic acid residue of the protein torsinA. DYT1 dystonia patients show reduced striatal dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) binding activity. We previously reported reduced striatal D2R proteins and impaired corticostriatal plasticity in Dyt1 ΔGAG heterozygous knock-in (Dyt1 KI) mice. It remains unclear how the D2R reduction contributes to the pathogenesis of DYT1 dystonia.

view more

A New MRI Measure to Early Differentiate Progressive Supranuclear Palsy From De Novo Parkinson's Disease in Clinical Practice: An International Study

Movement Disorders

Enlargement of the third ventricle has been reported in atypical parkinsonism. We investigated whether the measurement of third ventricle width could distinguish Parkinson's disease (PD) from progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP).

view more

Media

Publications:

Documents:

Photos:

loading image loading image

Videos:

A Biomarker to track Parkinson's disease progression  - UF Health Parkinson Symposium 2015

Audio:

Languages (1)

  • English

Affiliations (5)

  • Society for the Neural Control of Movement : Member
  • Society for Neuroscience : Member
  • Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society : Associate Member
  • NASPSPA : Member
  • New York Academy of Sciences : Member