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Ravindra Kolhe, PhD - Augusta University. Augusta, GA, US

Ravindra Kolhe, PhD Ravindra Kolhe, PhD

Director, Georgia Esoteric & Molecular Laboratory at Augusta University | Augusta University

Augusta, GA, UNITED STATES

Ravindra Kolhe is a Molecular and Genetic Pathologist, involved in identifying and validating cutting-edge platforms for diagnostic medicine

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AU Health COVID-19 Anniversary: The Light at the End of the Tunnel (Part II)

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Biography

As a Molecular and Genetic Pathologist, Ravindra Kolhe is actively engaged in molecular and cytogenetic evaluation of patient samples as a part of the multi- disciplinary clinical team treating patients. It is his goal to render not only the most accurate diagnosis but also to provide and develop the highest quality predictive and prognostic tests as a part of personalized medicine. This approach helps his clinical colleagues take the best possible care of the patient while at the same time advancing our scientific knowledge in these areas. Dr. Kolhe's clinical work involves molecular evaluation of various pathologic disorders and malignancies.
As a CLIA Laboratory Director, he is involved in identifying and validating newer cutting-edge platforms for diagnostic medicine. He is actively collaborating with industry partners and platform manufacturers to develop, validate new instruments for pathology. Dr. Kolhe is also actively involved in medical and graduate education and translation pathology research.

Areas of Expertise (4)

Pathology Informatics

Genetic Pathology

Molecular Pathology

Surgical Pathology

Media Appearances (9)

Sequencing respiratory viruses provides new insight on coinfections, viral spread and COVID

Jagwire  online

2021-11-01

Coinfection is a reality, Kolhe says with these respiratory viruses that we unwittingly transmit through the air when we cough, sneeze, even talk, particularly when we are in close quarters for long periods like hospitals, nursing homes, schools and potentially even our workplace...

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Breakout test: Viral panel tracks COVID variants, flu, other viruses at same time

The Augusta Chronicle  online

2021-10-28

"So the idea was, is there a way we can capture everything in one go?" said Dr. Ravindra Kolhe, director of the GEM Lab...

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Next Gen Sequencing Panel Accurately Detects 41 Respiratory Viruses

Clinical OMICs  online

2021-11-01

“We are concerned that because most of us are no longer wearing masks or social distancing and have mostly resumed our normal schedules that one consequence will be more coinfections,” says Ravindra Kolhe...

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Augusta University scientists study COVID antibodies

WRDW  tv

2021-07-21

Augusta University scientists are studying how long antibodies last for COVID-19 in different scenarios with different strains. The goal is to make the vaccines better and find out when we all need to start getting booster shots. With the Delta variant causing a spike in cases we went to find out what they’ve found so far.

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Bionano Genomics Announces Publication of the First Study to Combine OGM and NGS to Evaluate Myeloid Cancers

Yahoo  online

2022-01-26

This study reported superior performance as compared to standard methods and marks two major developments in the ongoing evaluation of combined OGM and NGS workflows. This study is the first published example where the combination of workflows was applied in the context of myeloid cancers, and demonstrated higher sensitivity, resolution, accuracy and ability to reveal cryptic and clinically relevant novel variants in myeloid cancers as compared to standard methods. This is also the first study to publish results using the simultaneous visualization and interpretation of sequence and copy number variants (CNVs) in the BioDiscovery NxClinical software v6.1 from OGM and NGS data. “This research demonstrated that the combination of OGM and a 523-gene NGS panel is superior to standard methods and cost effective for comprehensive genomic profiling of myeloid cancers. When compared to whole-genome sequencing approaches that others have suggested, I believe it has better detection performance at a lower cost,” commented Dr. Ravindra Kolhe, Associate Dean for Translational Research at Medical College of Georgia and Director of the Georgia Esoteric and Molecular Laboratory at Augusta University. “With new tools to simultaneously visualize sequence variants and structural variants, we are well-positioned to move this approach into routine use, which we expect will deepen our understanding of hematological malignancies.”

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Got severely ill from COVID? Genetics may have made that more likely, MCG researchers find

Augusta Chronicle  print

2022-01-27

Scientists may finally have found genetic clues for why some patients get sicker from COVID-19 and similar patients do not, according to findings from an international consortium hosted at Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. "This is a huge effort across the globe trying to figure that out," said Dr. Ravindra Kolhe, who helped form the consortium of 30 labs working on the problem. It includes researchers at Harvard Medical School, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and labs in Germany and the Netherlands.

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Small group of genetic variants found in COVID patients may help understand how people get sick

ANI  online

A recent study has identified a handful of rare structural gene variants, involved in body processes of some of the sickest patients, like inflammation, which the COVID-19 virus needed, to be successful. The study published at the international collaborative, COVID-19 Host Genome Research consortium, in the journal of ‘iScience,’ is an attempt to better understand the tremendous range of responses to infection with the COVID-19 virus, from symptom free to critically ill. “The virus has to attach to our cells, it has to get inside our cells and it has to multiply inside our cells. It also has to attack inflammation,” said Dr. Ravindra Kolhe, director of the Georgia Esoteric and Molecular Laboratory at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. “We have identified genes with structural changes in very sick individuals that are part of all four of these essential processes.”

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MCG researchers identify genetic differences that may explain severity of COVID-19 cases

WJBF  

2022-01-31

For the last two years, researchers around the world have tried to learn why some people get severely sick from COVID-19 while others have mild symptoms or no symptoms at all. “Each and every individual responds differently to the virus,” Dr. Ravindra Kolhe, the Director of the Georgia Esoteric and Molecular Laboratory at the Medical College of Georgia, explained. “At this point, we know that even if it’s the exact same virus and exact same variant, people do respond differently each and every time.” Dr. Ravindra Kolhe and a team at the Medical College of Georgia began looking at genes. They identified seven gene variants that may affect if a person is susceptible to becoming severely ill after being infected with the virus. Kolhe explains that these variants may cause the virus to affect a person’s cells.

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Small group of genetic variants found in extremely ill patients with COVID may help explain big differences in how sick people get

Science Daily  online

2021-12-31

The search to better understand the tremendous range of responses to infection with the COVID-19 virus -- from symptom free to critically ill -- has uncovered in some of the sickest patients a handful of rare structural gene variants involved in body processes, like inflammation, which the virus needs to be successful. "The virus has to attach to our cells, it has to get inside our cells and it has to multiply inside our cells. It also has to attract inflammation," says Dr. Ravindra Kolhe, director of the Georgia Esoteric and Molecular Laboratory at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. "We have identified genes with structural changes in very sick individuals that are part of all four of these essential processes."

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Articles (3)

Monocytic and granulocytic myeloid derived suppressor cells differentially regulate spatiotemporal tumour plasticity during metastatic cascade

Nature Communications

2017-04-06

It is widely accepted that dynamic and reversible tumour cell plasticity is required for metastasis, however, in vivo steps and molecular mechanisms are poorly elucidated.

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Gender-specific differential expression of exosomal miRNA in synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis

Scientific Reports

2017-05-17

The pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) is poorly understood, and therapeutic approaches are limited to preventing progression of the disease. Recent studies have shown that exosomes play a vital role in cell-to-cell communication, and pathogenesis of many age-related diseases.

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COVID-19 Virulence in Aged Patients Might Be Impacted by the Host Cellular MicroRNAs Abundance/Profile

Aging and Disease

2020-04-28

The World health organization (WHO) declared Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) a global pandemic and a severe public health crisis. Drastic measures to combat COVID-19 are warranted due to its contagiousness and higher mortality rates, specifically in the aged patient population.

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