T. Bettina Cornwell - University of Oregon. Eugene, OR, US

T. Bettina Cornwell T. Bettina Cornwell

Department of Marketing | University of Oregon

Eugene, OR, US

Expert in advertising and marketing, focusing on difficult and high context communications

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T. Bettina Cornwell, Lundquist Business of College Professor, University of Oregon Exploring potential perils of indirect marketing

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Biography

Bettina Cornwell is an expert in advertising and marketing. Her primary research interest is in difficult and high-context communications where many things are left unsaid and meaning is derived from actors, symbols, logos and the social milieu. This is found in indirect marketing, such as sponsorships, celebrity endorsements and brand placements. It is also central in international communication and in many public policy issues, such as how one communicates with children or how one encourages environmentally friendly behavior. She is also interested in memory for these types of communications and their immediate and long-term influence on behavior.

As the Edwin E. & June Woldt Cone professor of marketing, she explores how companies can do good via engagement with causes without miscommunicating. She also examines public policy issues regarding how children are influenced by marketing offerings.

Areas of Expertise (5)

Marketing Advertising Sponsorship Consumer Behavior Sports Marketing

Media Appearances (6)

NHL, NHLPA Unveil 'Declaration of Principles' to Guide Hockey Culture

Sports Illustrated  online

2017-09-06

''At a time when sport is under pressure from issues ranging from violence to doping to corruption, it is helpful for an organization to set principles that guide their behavior,'' University of Oregon marketing professor T. Bettina Cornwell said. ''In terms of marketing, and financial support from sponsors, they want to know what sport stands for and this statement goes some distance in describing a culture that should be appealing to a marketer or sponsor.''

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People who are lonely are more likely to buy products that have faces on them

Quartz  online

2017-08-23

“Visuals can fill a void for consumers experiencing a lack of social connection,” says Bettina Cornwell, professor of marketing at the University of Oregon. “When people see faces in branding materials, their likability for that brand goes up.”

The findings, which appear in the European Journal of Social Psychology, are rooted in our fundamental need to belong and our desire to form and sustain relationships. When people lack these social connections, they often attempt to fill the void in other ways, including through what they buy...

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Companies Not Shying Away From ‘Redskins’ Name

CBS DFW  online

2017-07-26

University of Oregon marketing professor T. Bettina Cornwell said PepsiCo “is not going into the situation blind.” She said the current political climate, in which the Redskins’ name is not under fire as much as it in previous years, might have emboldened the decision...

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Target makes big push into soccer marketing

Star Tribune  online

2017-01-19

It’s a smart move for companies to consider soccer as an advertising opportunity given its multi-ethnic audience and growth trajectory, said T. Bettina Cornwell, head of the marketing department at the University of Oregon...

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30 Sponsorship Executives Discuss Opportunities and Trends Headed Into 2017

The Sponsorship Space  online

2017-01-09

Any stocktaking of recent sponsorship must note the ascendance of eSports. Commentaries (including my own) have discussed how eSports will learn from sponsoring brands and from traditional sports. Into the future, eSports might also teach traditional sports and brands a few things. Online connectivity and savvy arena tech are two areas where many traditional sports teams lag but where eSports excels. Brands and sports can also find templates in eSports for visual content and human branding that drive social sharing. An example here is the signing of David Bytheway (A British FIFA gamer with a great last name) by the German Wolfsburg club. David will wear the Wolfsburg jersey with the prominent VW logo...

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Twitter lands contract with NBA for original live programming

Los Angeles Times  online

2016-07-16

Unlike other sports deals Twitter has struck recently, this one does not include rights to stream games live. But the NBA partnership’s focus on shows can be seen as a first step, said T. Bettina Cornwell, professor of marketing at the University of Oregon...

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Articles (5)

Competence Enhancement and Anticipated Emotion as Motivational Drivers of Brand Attachment. Psychology & Marketing

2015

Focusing on the motivational processes underlying consumer attachments to brands, this research examines how competence enhancement and anticipated emotion (anxiety and joy) contribute to attachment. Personal attachment style (attachment anxiety) and type of motivation (intrinsic vs. extrinsic) are included as individual differences. Employing two field studies across different contexts indicates that competence enhancement leads to stronger attachments with anticipated anxiety (avoidance) and joy (approach) mediating this relationship. Analyses of moderated mediation further show that the effect mediated through anticipated emotion is stronger under conditions of high extrinsic and low intrinsic motivation, and when individual attachment anxiety is low. Implications for brand attachment research and management are discussed.

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Visual Processing and Need for Cognition Can Enhance Event-Sponsorship Outcomes Journal of Advertising Research

2015

How do sporting-event attendees visually or cognitively process sponsorship? In the context of a professional tennis event, the current study examined attendees' visual processing and need for cognition in sponsorship processing. Need for cognition is a personality variable in psychology that reflects the extent to which consumers engage in and enjoy effortful cognitive activities. Findings demonstrated how visual processing played a role in the way attendees perceived sponsorship. Attendees who were high in need for cognition more likely would evaluate a non-endemic sponsor as fitting with the event than attendees who were lower in need for cognition.

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Memory for Sponsorship Relationships: A Critical Juncture in Thinking Psychology & Marketing

2013

Marketing communications that utilize partnerships between a brand or corporation and a sport, art, or community activity are thoroughly integrated into our understanding of business behavior. Despite the ubiquity of sponsorship relationships as the bases of communication platforms, we still do not understand fully how they work when successful, and how they do not work when they fail. Memory is important to the communication function of all sponsorships and a strategic objective of many. Thus, we explore memory for sponsorship relationships. The aim is to codify our progress to date in measuring memory-related sponsorship outcomes, to identify where shortcomings in our understanding remain and to move toward more complete and explanatory models of sponsorship effects. Topics discussed include: memory as a measure of sponsorship success, strong and weak memory objectives, implicit and explicit memory, interference from competitors, strategic encoding processes, cueing memory retrieval, redefining memories, and enhancing memory for sponsorship relationships.

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State of Art and Science in Sponsorship-linked Marketing Journal of Advertising

2008

This is a stock-taking paper in the area of sponsorship-linked marketing. First offered is a summary of the development of sponsorship as a mainstay of marketing communications. Arguments for the entrenchment of sponsorship in a new evolving indirect marketing mix are made. Progress in understanding the art of management and the science of communications measurement are then examined. Finally, a brief research agenda is described.

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Sponsorship-linked Marketing: The Role of Articulation in Memory Journal of Consumer Research

2006

Corporate sponsorship of events contributes significantly to marketing aims, including brand awareness as measured by recall and recognition of sponsor-event pairings. Unfortunately, resultant advantages accrue disproportionately to brands having a natural or congruent fit with the available sponsorship properties. In three cued-recall experiments, the effect of articulation of sponsorship fit on memory for sponsor-event pairings is examined. While congruent sponsors have a natural memory advantage, results demonstrate that memory improvements via articulation are possible for incongruent sponsor-event pairings. These improvements are, however, affected by the presence of competitor brands and the way in which memory is accessed.

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