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Thea Pepperl, Ph.D. - VCU College of Engineering. Engineering East Hall, Room 1246, Richmond, VA, US

Thea Pepperl, Ph.D. Thea Pepperl, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering | B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute | Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University | VCU College of Engineering

Engineering East Hall, Room 1246, Richmond, VA, UNITED STATES

Thea Pepperl's research and expertise focuses on the analysis and design of decision tools for the coordination of care of older adults.

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Biography

Thea Pepperl, Ph.D., earned her Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering at Virginia Commonwealth University. She teaches Intro to Engineering and Computational Methods in the Biomedical Engineering Department. Her research interests include the use of high-frequency ultrasound to investigate wound healing, automatic segmentation of pressure images to investigate the development of pressure ulcers, and the analysis and design of decision tools for the care coordination of older adults.

Industry Expertise (2)

Education/Learning

Research

Areas of Expertise (3)

Image analysis

Image segmentation

Health Informatics

Education (2)

Virginia Commonwealth University: Ph.D., Biomedical Engineering

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute: B.S., Biomedical & Electrical Engineering

Affiliations (1)

  • Virginia Academy of Science Biomedical Engineering Society

Selected Articles (1)

Effect of alertness level and backrest elevation on skin interface pressure Europe PMC

2014 Critically ill patients may experience reduced mobility and sensation related to various pharmacologic therapies and treatments, making this patient population especially susceptible to pressure ulcers. An alert patient may be better able to reposition in response to discomfort, therefore preventing the development of pressure ulcers. However, little is known about the effect of an individual's alertness level on skin interface pressures. This study describes the effect of alertness level and backrest elevation on skin interface pressures.

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