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Todd Powell-Williams - Augusta University. Augusta, GA, US

Todd Powell-Williams Todd Powell-Williams

Associate Professor of Sociology | Augusta University

Augusta, GA, UNITED STATES

Professor Powell-Williams is an expert in social movements, social control, religion, police science and symbolic interactionism.

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Biography

Professor Powell-Williams is an expert in social movements, social control, religion, police science and symbolic interactionism.

Areas of Expertise (4)

Social Control Police Science Religion Symbolic Interactionism

Media Appearances (1)

What's in a name? Exploring the practice of name discrimination

WFXG 54  tv

2015-11-05

Todd Powell Williams, a sociology professor at Georgia Regents University said, "It shows that there are, indeed, disparities in employment opportunities and that people make judgments not so much on social class, but, rather race based upon the name."

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Articles (3)

“God Hates Your Feelings”: Neutralizing Emotional Deviance within the Westboro Baptist Church Deviant Behavior

Todd Powell- Williams & Melissa Powell-Williams

2016

Drawing on individual and peer-group interviews, participant observations, and analysis of media content, we examine the habitual emotional deviance and neutralization techniques employed by the Westboro Baptist Church.

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Engaging Boys in Eradicating Gender-based Violence: A Pilot Study of a Promundo-adapted Program MSC - Masculinities and social change

Allison Foley, Kimberly Davies, Todd Powell-Williams

2015

The Brazil-based Promundo organization originated in 1997 and developed Program H to engage young men in the fight for gender equality...

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"I Help the Ones that Want Help": Emotion Work and the Victim Advocate Role Sociological Spectrum

Powell-Williams, M., White, S. D. & Powell-Williams, T.

2013-03-28

Using data gathered from participant observation and 32 individual in-depth interviews, this study examines how victim advocates achieve emotion management in their work with battered women. This research reveals that victim advocates often experience difficulty coping with occupational stress via daily “deep acting” strategies as they work to change their understandings of battered women and the advocate role from the “inside out.” The data reveal that the core of their ability to cope requires victim advocates to redefine their perceived role from “savior” to “options giver” to more accurately define their role interactions with battered women.

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