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Anthony Cox - Indiana University, Kelley School of Business. Indianapolis, IN, US

Anthony Cox Anthony Cox

Professor of Marketing | Indiana University, Kelley School of Business

Indianapolis, IN, UNITED STATES

Marketing expert, theorizing the relationship between the intentions and behaviors of consumers

Secondary Titles (2)

  • Kelley Venture Fellow
  • Faculty Chair, Business of Medicine Physician MBA Program

Biography

Anthony Cox is a Professor of Marketing, Kelley Venture Fellow, and the Faculty Chair of the Business of Medicine Physician MBA program at the IU Kelley School of Business. His research examines consumer health behavior, including how consumers evaluate and select health care providers, and how consumers decide whether or not to engage in preventive health behaviors such as vaccination, cancer screening and HIV testing. In collaboration with colleagues in both the Kelley School and the IU School of Medicine, he has been a co-investigator on three major NIH-funded projects examining these issues. Cox' research has been published in top journals in both business and health, including Journal of Marketing, Journal of Marketing Research, Journal of Consumer Research, Health Psychology and Journal of Adolescent Health. He has been the recipient of several teaching awards, including the Trustees Teaching Award, and has extensive experience providing consulting and executive education in the health care industry.

Areas of Expertise (7)

Consumers and Preventative Health Behaviors

How Measuring Consumers' Intentions and Attitudes Influences their Subsequent Behavior

Medical Products and Decision-Making

Consumer Risk Evaluation

How Message-Framing Influences Health-Related Behaviors

Consumer Health Behavior

Consumer Evaluation and Selection of Healthcare Providers

Education (3)

Indiana University - Kelley School of Business: PhD, Marketing 1984

Indiana University - Kelley School of Business: MBA, Marketing 1982

Michigan State University: BA, History 1976

Articles (5)

To Err is human? How typographical and orthographical errors affect perceptions of online reviewers Computers in Human Behavior

2017 Consumers increasingly rely on online product reviews when making purchase decisions. However, assessing the credibility of online reviewers presents consumers with unique challenges. This paper examines how consumer perceptions of reviewer credibility are influenced by the presence and type of textual errors in the review itself. The results of an online experiment indicate that consumers’ reactions to textual errors are moderated by their general trust in others. Low-trust consumers are relatively insensitive to textual errors in judging reviewer credibility. However, high-trust consumers are less forgiving of typographical errors (which may signal carelessness) than orthographical errors (which may indicate cognitive challenges). Implications for future research are discussed.

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Does perceived risk influence the effects of message framing? Revisiting the link between prospect theory and message framing Health psychology review

2016 Health-promoting messages can be framed in terms of the beneficial consequences of healthy behaviour (gain-framed messages) or the detrimental consequences of unhealthy behaviour (loss-framed messages).

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Escherichia coli induces platelet aggregation in an FcγRIIa‐dependent manner Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis

2016 The discovery of pathogen-recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors on platelets has led to the emergence of the concept of platelets as important components of the host response to infection.

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Trust and transparency: patient perceptions of physicians' financial relationships with pharmaceutical companies The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics

2014 Financial relationships and business transactions between physicians and the health care industry are common. These relationships take a variety of forms, including payments to physicians in exchange for consulting services, reimbursement of physician travel expenses when attending medical device and pharmaceutical educational conferences, physician ownership in life science company stocks, and the provision of free drug samples.

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The effects of HIV testing advocacy messages on test acceptance: a randomized clinical trial BMC medicine

2014 Nearly 1 in 5 people living with HIV in the United States are unaware they are infected. Therefore, it is important to develop and evaluate health communication messages that clinicians can use to encourage HIV testing.

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