A safer crash landing? NASA research is making sure those on the ground are safe when drones fall from the sky

A safer crash landing? NASA research is making sure those on the ground are safe when drones fall from the sky A safer crash landing?  NASA research is making sure those on the ground are safe when drones fall from the sky

May 30, 20171 min read
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What goes up must come down. It’s a simple law Sir Isaac Newton came up with in the 17th century and is still applicable today. But when it comes to drones – what happens when there’s an emergency or a unit must crash? With more and more drones in the sky and more companies looking to incorporate the technology as a delivery system – what will it mean to the people on the ground if one suddenly is falling from the sky?


In comes NASA. Researchers developing new technology to help drones automatically spot the best places to crash-land without hurting anyone on the ground.


It’s experimental for now but could see the way industry, legislators and the public use and incorporate this technology.

But how does it work, will the FAA agree and will regulations ease on the unmanned aircraft that are now part of everyday life?

That’s where the experts at Farmingdale State College can help. Dr. Michael Canders is an Associate Professor in the Department of Aviation at Farmingdale. He has flown helicopters and fighter jets for over three decades and is an expert in aviation, aircraft and drone technology. Michael is available to speak about this topic – simply click on his icon to arrange an interview.


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  • Michael  Canders
    Michael Canders Aviation Center Director, Associate Professor

    Dr. Canders is an airline transport pilot, commercial helicopter pilot, and drone pilot with more than 4,000 flying hours experience.

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