As CO2 levels reached 415 parts per million for the first time in human history – our experts can explain why this new record is nothing to celebrate.

As CO2 levels reached 415 parts per million for the first time in human history – our experts can explain why this new record is nothing to celebrate. As CO2 levels reached 415 parts per million for the first time in human history – our experts can  explain why this new record is nothing to celebrate.

May 22, 20192 min read
Featuring:

Climate change – it’s part of the daily conversation and despite the summits, the speeches, the political promises and viral videos, it seems the amount of greenhouse gases entering the atmosphere keep increasing.


As levels rise, so too does the concern.  Recently, UC San Diego had one of its pre-eminent experts on climate change referenced in Climate Change Weekly (see attached).


Comment from Ralph Keeling, director of Scripps CO2 Program: “Every year it goes up like this we should be saying 'No, this shouldn’t be happening. It’s not normal." This increase is just not sustainable in terms of energy use and in terms of what we are doing to the planet.” Climate Change Weekly, May 18, 2019


The article also shows how global and mainstream climate change conversations have become in politics, government and the media.


  • But how dire is it?  
  • Can people understand what 415 ppm really means?
  • Why do levels keep rising despite the attention and action?
  • Is it going to require a massive shift to course correct our carbon dioxide emissions?
  • And what do governments need to do to reverse the current trend?

Climate change is not an easy topic to grasp once it comes to the finer details – and that’s where our experts can help.


Ralph Keeling is a professor of geochemistry in the Geosciences Research Division of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. He is considered a leading global authority on carbon dioxide and the global greenhouse effect associated with emissions of the gas through human activities and also serves as director of the Scripps CO2 Program. Ralph is available to speak to media regarding this issue – simply click on his icon to arrange an interview.




Connect with:
  • Ralph Keeling
    Ralph Keeling Professor

    Ralph Keeling's research focuses on atmospheric composition, the carbon cycle, and climate change.

Spotlight By UC San Diego

powered by Powered By

You might also like...