Are America’s teachers equipped to help kids coping with trauma – let our experts explain.

Are America’s teachers equipped to help kids coping with trauma – let our experts explain. Are America’s teachers equipped to help kids coping with trauma – let our experts explain.

August 16, 20192 min read

At a time when roughly half of all U.S. children experience at least one adverse experience during their schooling, only 40% of the nation’s teachers feel they possess adequate strategies to help students develop social and emotional skills to cope with trauma.


A recent survey (see attached) shows that there are serious gaps when it comes to helping America’s children handle and overcome adverse childhood experiences.


The survey also revealed:


  • 78% of teachers feel that it is part of their job to help students develop strong social and emotional skills. 
  • Nearly 92% feel that the teaching of social-emotional skills will improve student safety.
  • Only 29% had received mental health training.
  • 43% found finding ways to help students who appear to be struggling with problems outside of school difficult.
  • 23% said their most challenging task was finding ways to help students who appear to be experiencing emotional or psychological distress.


Social and emotional learning is critical to student development and should be prioritized in teacher education.


That’s where the experts from Western Governors University are approaching education differently. The school is integrating social and emotional learning into its curriculum for teachers, helping graduates and the next generation of teacher bring trauma-informed education into tomorrow’s classroom.


Are you a journalist covering education and the state of America’s classrooms? That’s where our experts can help.


Dr. Deborah Eldridge is an expert in program strategy, curriculum development, accreditation, and licensure for teacher education. Dr. Eldridge is available to speak with media regarding this topic – simply click on her icon to arrange an interview.




powered by Powered By

You might also like...