Covering CRISPR, gene editing – and what it might mean for generations to come? Our experts can help

Covering CRISPR, gene editing – and what it might mean for generations to come? Our experts can help Covering CRISPR, gene editing – and what it might mean for generations to come? Our experts can help

October 21, 20201 min read
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The two scientists who took the concept of gene editing to the forefront were recently rewarded with the Nobel Peace Prize in Chemistry. The efforts of scientists Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna and the development of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats have taken a vaguely titled idea named CRISPR into the modern conversation.


Since then, this process has transcended itself into medicine, agriculture and a host of other scientific applications being used around the world today.




There is a lot to know about CRISPR: How does it work, what are the risks and what are the potential rewards that have yet to be discovered? There is also a lot of concern about how gene editing could transform life and future life as we know it.


If you are a journalist looking to know more about CRISPR, Augusta University has the expert you need for your questions and coverage.





Dr. Paul Langridge is an acclaimed scientist specializing in morphogenesis, CRISPR, signal transduction, and cell and molecular biology. He is an expert when it comes to the topics of gene editing and has used the same technologies that the Nobel winners also used in their research. Langridge is available to speak with any reporters looking to cover this topic; simply click on his icon to arrange an interview today.




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  • Paul Langridge
    Paul Langridge ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

    An acclaimed scientist specializing in morphogenesis, CRISPR, synthetic biology, signal transduction, and cell and molecular biology.

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