MEDIA RELEASE: Plan ahead: Don’t wait until the last minute to check your car battery

Feb 11, 2021

2 min

Tony Tsai



Ahead of the Family Day long weekend, CAA South Central Ontario (CAA SCO) is recommending that drivers go out and start your cars to make sure your batteries are in good condition and ready to power your vehicle the next time you need it.


“We have been at home, and our cars have been sitting idle for extended periods of time. Turning your car on before you need it will determine if your battery will start, and driving your vehicle once every 2 weeks will ensure the battery will be charged and ready to go,” says Tony Tsai, vice president of corporate communications and services for CAA SCO.


If your car does not start and you suspect it’s the battery, CAA recommends you make an appointment to get your car battery checked to ensure it is in good shape.

“We are anticipating higher than normal call volumes next week as the province eases restrictions. If you do require battery service don’t leave it to the last minute,” says Tsai.


So how do you know your battery is on its way out? One sign is your vehicle’s headlights will dim when idling and brighten when you rev the engine. Also, listen for cranking, grinding or clicking when you turn on your ignition, these are all signs that your car battery needs to be replaced.


For CAA members, if your battery is giving you problems or you are unsure if it’s time to replace it, you can call CAA’s mobile Battery Service at *222 to have a trained CAA Battery Service Representative come test your battery and provide a helping hand.


In comparison, a battery check at automotive facilities across Ontario can take up to 30 minutes and can range from $30 to $50.


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Tony Tsai

Tony Tsai

Vice President, Corporate Communications and Services

Tony Tsai oversees the organization's internal and external communications.

Corporate CommunicationInternal CommunicationLeadershipManagementProject Management

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