Did the Johnson & Johnson pause impact COVID-19 vaccine hesitation in Black and Hispanic communities?

Did the Johnson & Johnson pause impact COVID-19 vaccine hesitation in Black and Hispanic communities? Did the Johnson & Johnson pause impact COVID-19 vaccine hesitation in Black and Hispanic communities?

April 27, 20211 min read
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The Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently lifted the pause on the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine. The agencies had shelved the vaccine after it was linked to cases of an extremely rare blood clotting disorder.


Public health officials are now concerned that as news gets out about the potential side effects of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, some members of the Black and Hispanic communities may opt out of what could be a life-saving act.


“To the Black and Hispanic communities, there has been a long history of untrustworthy behavior by health care systems, and the current issue with Johnson & Johnson may have worsened some hesitancy,” said Dr. Justin X. Moore, an epidemiologist in the Department of Population Health Sciences at the Medical College of Georgia. “To overcome this barrier, companies must continue being open about side effects of the vaccine, and health care workers must be empathetic and listen to their patients’ concerns.”




Vaccine safety and the importance of everyone being vaccinated is crucial as America looks to get to the light at the end of this pandemic. If you are a journalist covering COVID-19 and the issues surrounding vaccine hesitancy, then let our experts help.


Dr. Justin Moore is an expert in spatial epidemiology and an associate professor at the Institute of Public and Preventive Health at Augusta University. He is available to speak with media regarding this topic – simply click on his name to arrange an interview.



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  • Justin  Moore
    Justin Moore Epidemiologist in the Department of Population Health Sciences

    A global leader in epidemiology and research in tracing the spread of COVID-19 among minorities.

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