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Jesse Bockstedt - Emory University, Goizueta Business School. Atlanta, GA, US

Jesse Bockstedt Jesse Bockstedt

Goizueta Foundation Term Associate Professor of Information Systems & Operations Management | Emory University, Goizueta Business School

Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES

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Biography

Jesse Bockstedt completed his PhD in Information Systems at the University of Minnesota's Carlson School of Management in 2008. Prior to joining the faculty at Emory in 2016, Bockstedt held positions at George Mason University and the University of Arizona. Bockstedt's primary research focus is behavioral economic issues in technology-mediated environments. His articles have been published in a number of leading journals including Production and Operations Management, MIS Quarterly, Information Systems Research, and Journal of MIS.

Areas of Expertise (10)

Behavioral Economics

Online Consumer Behavior

Electronic Commerce

Crowdsourcing

Cybersecurity

IT Evolution

Microeconomics

Online Privacy

Personalization Systems

Social Engineering

Education (3)

Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota – Twin Cities: PhD, Information Systems 2008

University of Minnesota – Twin Cities: MS, Mechanical Engineering 2004

University of Wisconsin - Madison: BS, Mechanical Engineering 1999

Media Appearances (3)

CNN Newsroom | What to know re: New E.U. Privacy Law (GDPR)

CNN International  tv

2018-05-26

Associate Professor, Information Systems Jesse Bockstedt explains New Internet Privacy Rules (GDPR).

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Apple Music Launch: Too Bad Steve Jobs Is Not Around

Forbes  online

2015-06-30

"Does Apple Music’s song recommendations live up to this potential? The simple answer is no. I tested Apples Music’s recommendation engines with Jesse Bockstedt, a faculty member at University of Arizona who is a music aficionado and has done some very interesting research on recommendation engines. We both downloaded Apple Music and formed a preliminary impression on the quality of its recommendations..."

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How Virtual Recommendations Shape Your Music Preferences

Carlson School of Management  online

2015-11-12

"Thanks to a growing number of streaming services like Apple Music, it’s now easier than ever for listeners to discover their new favorite song or artist among millions of choices.

Online platforms that suggest new music, movies, and products based on consumers’ established preferences are powered by recommender systems—dynamic algorithms that leverage users’ virtual behavior to suggest products or content that they have not yet purchased, experienced, or considered..."

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Articles (5)

Heterogeneous Submission Behavior and its Implications for Success in Innovation Contests with Public Submissions Production and Operations Management

2016

Innovation contests are increasingly adopting a format where submissions are viewable by all contestants and the information structure changes during the contest. In such an “unblind” format, contestants must weigh the costs of revealing their submissions against the benefits of improving their submissions through emerging information. We take a closer look at how contestants solve problems in innovation contests with public submission of solutions—that is, unblind contests, by examining the implications of their submission behavior for contest outcomes. We analyze ...

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Problem-Solving Effort and Success in Innovation Contests: The Role of National Wealth and National Culture Journal of Operations Management

2015

Innovation contests allow firms to harness specialized skills and services from globally dispersed participants for solutions to business problems. Such contests provide a rich setting for operations management (OM) scholars to explore problem solving in global labor markets as firms continue to unbundle their innovation value chains. In this study, we examine the implications of specific types of diversity in innovation contests on problem-solving effort and success. First, we conceptualize diversity among contestants in terms of national wealth (measured as gross ...

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Overcoming Free-Riding in Information Goods: Sanctions or Rewards? 48th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences

2015

Economic environments involving information goods suffer from an extensive free-riding problem. For example, social loafing and lurking on discussion forums, leeching on file-sharing networks, and pirating of digital goods. Despite their use, it is not clear what types of interventions result in the best outcomes for all players involved. We conduct a lab experiment using a public goods game to explore the role of rewards and sanctions or free-riding behavior at both the individual and group levels. Our results provide interesting insights on the behavior of free-riding and the use of ...

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Bundling Effects on Variety Seeking for Digital Information Goods Journal of Management Information Systems

2015

Prior research with consumable goods has consistently found that consumers have a preference for greater variety when selecting items simultaneously as a bundle, rather than as a sequential series of individual decisions. However, digital information goods have a number of important differences from consumable goods that may impact variety-seeking behavior. In three experiments, we address two general research questions. First, as a precursor to studying digital goods, we disentangle the role of bundle cohesion (i.e., item relatedness) from the role of timing ...

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Customized Bundling and Consumption Variety of Digital Information Goods Journal of Management Information Systems

2014

Customized bundling retail strategies have become increasingly popular online. In customized bundling, consumers decide the bundle's components, and the effects of this change on consumption variety have important implications for information goods retailers. Although reduction in transaction and search costs increases supply-side product variety, customized bundling can introduce new types of friction in the consumption process. We show that customization of information good bundles reduces consumption variety through two effects: design cost effects ...

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