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Matthew Bandelt - New Jersey Institute of Technology. Newark, NJ, US

Matthew Bandelt Matthew Bandelt

Assistant Professor and Associate Chair | New Jersey Institute of Technology

Newark, NJ, UNITED STATES

Professor Bandelt focuses on cement-based composites to improve the behavior, durability and environmental impact of concrete structures.

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CE 631 - Lecture 2 - Excel Demo

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Biography

Matthew Bandelt completed his Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University in 2015 where he specialized in the use of innovative construction materials to improve the performance of structural systems. Recent research has focused on cement-based composites which incorporate small polymeric and steel fibers to improve the structural behavior and durability of reinforced concrete structures. He has developed specifications to aid in design of structures using these composites, as well as computational modeling tools to predict their behavior under earthquake loading. He is currently exploring the use of these composites, and other novel construction materials, to improve infrastructure durability against harsh environmental conditions, and to decrease construction times and project delays. Dr. Bandelt is a recipient of the prestigious National Science Foundation Graduation Research Fellowship (NSF-GRF), and has also received awards from the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) and the American Society of Civil Engineers Structural Engineering Institute (ASCE-SEI).

Areas of Expertise (4)

Computational Modeling

Polymeric Fibers

Construction

Reinforced Concrete

Accomplishments (5)

James M. Gere Research Fellowship

2014

NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Recipient

2011

ASCE/SEI – Student Structural Design Competition First Place Award

2010

AISC – Education Foundation Fred R. Havens Fellowship Recipient

2010

Villanova University Dean of Engineering Academic Excellence Award

2010

Education (3)

Stanford University: Ph.D., Civil Engineering 2015

Villanova University: M.S., Civil Engineering 2011

Villanova University: B.S., Civil Engineering 2010

Affiliations (7)

  • Bandelt Research Group
  • Professional Engineer - NJ, PA
  • American Concrete Institute (ACI) Voting Member
  • American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC)
  • American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
  • Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI)
  • American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE)

Media Appearances (1)

Bridge construction technique in fatal Florida collapse is widely used in New Jersey

NorthJersey.com  

2018-05-06

“This is becoming an increasingly common method of construction, and there are thousands of bridges across the United States constructed using these methods,” said Matthew Bandelt, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at the New Jersey Institute of Technology...

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Event Appearances (7)

Predicting UHPC Structural Response at Ultimate Limit State through Numerical Simulation

Second International Interactive Symposium on UHPC  Albany, NY

Fiber-Based Modeling of Reinforced HPFRCC Hinge Zones

11th National Conference on Earthquake Engineering  Los Angeles, CA

Simulation of Reinforced HPFRCC Deformation Capacity under Flexure- and Shear-Dominated Stress States

Computational Modeling of Concrete and Concrete Structures  Bad Hofgastein, Austria

Influence of HPFRCC Tensile Properties on Numerical Simulation Of Reinforced HPFRCC Component Behavior

Ninth International Symposium on Fiber Reinforced Concrete  Vancouver, BC

Influence of Field-Cast Tensile Properties and Test Methods on Simulated Reinforced HPFRCC Component Behavior

Ninth International Conference on Fracture Mechanics of Concrete and Concrete Structures  Berkeley, CA

Impact of Reinforcement Ratio on Deformation Capacity of Reinforced High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composites

Seventh International RILEM Conference on High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composites  Stuttgart, Germany

Monotonic and Cyclic Bond-slip Behavior of Ductile High-performance Fiber-reinforced Cement-based Composites

Third International RILEM Conference on Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites  Delft, Netherlands

Research Grants (7)

Advanced Reinforced Concrete Materials for Transportation Infrastructure

New Jersey Department of Transportation $177,433.20

2019-05-01

The objectives of this project are to: (i) identify novel materials that can be rapidly deployed in New Jersey’s reinforced concrete transportation infrastructure to improve the longevity and reduce the long-term costs of new and existing construction; (ii) select cost-effective and structurally feasible materials in coordination with NJDOT for evaluation using experimental and computational methods to benchmark constructability, deterioration behavior across a range of mechanisms, and in-service structural performance among a diverse group of materials; (iii) compare the economic impacts of different advanced materials across durability mechanisms and structural applications by performing life-cycle cost analyses; and (iv) develop guidelines and specifications so that the materials can be rapidly deployed across the state in appropriate applications.

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Long-Term Infrastructure Performance (LTIP) Team

Federal Highway Administration $106,261

2018 The Long-Term Infrastructure Performance (LTIP) Programs include the Long-Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) Program and the Long-Term Bridge Performance (LTBP) Program. These programs, conducted in collaboration with the State department of transportation infrastructure owners, provide for characterization and monitoring of in-service highway pavement test sections (LTPP) and bridges (LTBP) to assemble the data needed to improve infrastructure design and advance the understanding of highway infrastructure performance necessary to effectively manage transportation assets. The collected data are disseminated to the public through web-based portals. Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA’s) investment in obtaining and disseminating the data is leveraged by both public and private sector research organizations that apply the data to address a variety of infrastructure performance needs of local, State, regional, and national interest.

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University Transportation Center (UTC) Region 2

United States Department of Transportation $300,000

2018 DOT invests in the future of transportation through its University Transportation Centers (UTC) Program, which awards and administers grants to consortia of colleges and universities across the United States. The UTC Program advances the state-of-the-art in transportation research and technology, and develops the next generation of transportation professionals. The Congressionally-mandated program has been in place since 1987 to help address our nation’s ever-growing need for the safe, efficient and environmentally sound movement of people and goods.

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Task Order 1: Long-Term Bridge Performance Program TSSC

Federal Highway Administration $69,362

2017

Mitigating Infrastructure Deterioration with Ductile Cement-based Composites

New Jersey Institute of Technology $7,500

2017

NJDOT Bridge Resource Program (BRP): Mass Concrete in Drilled Shafts

New Jersey Department of Transportation $13,955

2015

Stanford Graduate Research Fellow

National Science Foundation $130,000

2011 Investigated and advanced novel and damage tolerant construction materials. Performed experiments to analyze the bond-slip behavior of high-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composites (HPFRCCs) and mild steel reinforcement. Created and validated bond-slip constitutive material models to predict the performance of innovative HPFRCC materials under cyclic loads.

Articles (7)

Flexural Behavior of a Composite Steel and Precast Concrete Open Web Dissymmetric Framing System

Engineering Structures

Bandelt, MJ, SP Gross, DW Dinehart, JR Yost, and JD Pudeliner

2019 The use of composite construction has been incorporated into the design of steel components for decades, creating efficient and stiffer structures through the combined benefits of structural steel and reinforced concrete. Traditional floor systems develop composite action between vertically aligned elements using shear studs or other mechanical transfer elements. In this paper, the behavior of a composite structural system that combines steel beams, precast hollow core slabs, steel reinforcement, and cementitious grout in a unique geometry to create a shallow, monolithic, and composite floor assembly for use in residential and commercial construction is evaluated. Composite action is developed through a linear strain distribution between horizontally aligned concrete slab and steel beam elements. Experimental results from large-scale assembly testing of the composite system, known as the Girder-Slab System, are presented. The sensitivity of the system to material properties and structural geometry is investigated including effective width, section properties, and flexural strength. Comparisons of flexural section properties and strength are made between experimental performance and predictions using mechanics- and code-based principles.

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Mechanics and failure characteristics of hybrid fiber-reinforced concrete (HyFRC) composites with longitudinal steel reinforcement

Engineering Structures

Nguyen, W, MJ Bandelt, W Trono, SL Billington, and CP Ostertag

2019 While the properties of hybrid fiber-reinforced concrete (HyFRC) have been well-reported in the literature, the behavior of reinforced HyFRC (i.e., HyFRC with embedded steel rebar) is less understood. This paper investigates the mechanics and failure characteristics of reinforced HyFRC under direct tension. Samples with a low longitudinal steel reinforcement ratio were studied to evaluate the feasibility of reducing rebar congestion in structural applications through the use of fiber-reinforced concrete. Although reinforced HyFRC forms multiple cracking sites when loaded, rebar strain and HyFRC crack opening are generally concentrated at a single location under post-yield displacements. The onset of rebar plastic deformation and the exhaustion of fibers’ bridging load capacity are coincident events at a dominant crack. For a cracked reinforced HyFRC section to strengthen, the magnitude of load resistance increase from strain hardening rebar must exceed the magnitude of load resistance decrease from fiber pull-out processes. Comparisons are made with studies reported in the literature to demonstrate how longitudinal reinforcement ratio and fiber type influence cracking behavior and ultimate strain capacity. The research presented herein has far-reaching impacts on the structural design of all types of reinforced fiber-reinforced concrete materials detailed for a ductile response under large displacements.

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Understanding variability in recycled aggregate concrete mechanical properties through numerical simulation and statistical evaluation

Construction and Building Materials

Anuruddha Jayasuriya, Matthew P Adams, Matthew J Bandelt

2018 This paper investigates the effects of adhered mortar content on the mechanical properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) systems using two-dimensional finite element analysis of RAC specimens subjected to uniaxial compression. Sensitivity and statistical analyses of RAC systems were conducted to explore how individual material stiffnesses (aggregate, mortar matrix, adhered mortar, new Interfacial Transition Zone (ITZ), and old ITZ) and adhered mortar contents (2, 10, 20 and 50%) influence RAC mechanical performance. In total, 128 simulation results were performed to understand variability in stress development, damage progression, compressive strength, and elastic modulus of RAC systems. Statistical inferences on the effects of variability in material stiffness and adhered mortar content were made based on frequency distributions, probability density functions, Pareto charts, main effects plots, and bivariate contour plots. Numerical results showed that compressive strength and elastic modulus decreased with increasing adhered mortar contents, while the strain corresponding to compressive softening increased with adhered mortar contents. Statistical results showed that compressive strength was most significantly influenced by aggregate stiffness and mortar matrix stiffness. Strain localizations were observed near the aggregate boundaries due to large material stiffness discontinuities in the RAC meso-level structure. RAC elastic modulus and ultimate compressive strain were mainly governed by the stiffness of the mortar matrix. Based on the numerical results, bivariate contour plots were developed to understand how variations in material stiffness and adhered mortar content influence the strength and stiffness of RAC systems.

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Bond behavior and interface modeling of reinforced high-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composites

Cement and Concrete Composites

Matthew J Bandelt, Timothy E Frank, Michael D Lepech, Sarah L Billington

2017 High-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious-composites (HPFRCCs) reinforced with mild steel reinforcing bars have bond strengths that are higher than ordinary concrete under monotonic loading conditions. High bond strengths in HPFRCCs have been attributed to the material toughness of HPFRCCs, which effectively restrains splitting cracks under monotonic loads. Characterization of the interface between HPFRCCs and mild reinforcement under cyclic loads remains largely unknown. The bond-slip behavior of two HPFRCC mixtures are examined under monotonic and cyclic loads in beam-end flexural specimens. Bond strength is shown to deteriorate due to cyclic load reversals after the maximum bond stress is reached, resulting in lower bond-slip toughness. Three dimensional computational simulations are conducted to investigate observed crack patterns and internal deformations at the interface of the HPFRCC and steel reinforcement. Numerical simulation results predicted splitting crack patterns observed in physical experiments, and also suggest that interface crushing occurs at the intersection of the reinforcement lugs and HPFRCC material. Further, simulated performance shows that damage to the bond interface is altered by the deformation history applied to the interface.

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Bond behavior of steel reinforcement in high-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composite flexural members

Materials and Structures

Matthew J Bandelt, Sarah L Billington

2016 High-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composites (HPFRCCs) exhibit a pseudo strain hardening behavior in tension, and increased damage tolerance when loaded in compression. The unique properties of HPFRCC materials make them a viable material for increasing structural performance under severe loading conditions. In this paper, the bond performance of mild steel reinforcement embedded in HPFRCC beams is presented. Beam specimens with lap splices were tested in four-point bending to examine the bond strength and bond-slip behavior of steel reinforcement embedded in HPFRCC materials. Specimens made with three different HPFRCC mixtures, as well as a traditional normal weight concrete were tested in four point bending. The parameters investigated were the amount of concrete cover and the presence of steel confinement in the lap splice region. Experimental results show that HPFRCC normalized bond strengths increased by 37 %, on average, when compared to concrete. Furthermore, the bond-slip behavior of reinforcement in HPFRCCs had a higher toughness than observed for concrete specimens. Test results are compared with existing bond-slip models for fiber reinforced concrete from beam tests and HPFRCCs from pullout experiments, and a recommendation to modify the ascending branch of an existing bond-slip model applicable to ductile HPFRCCs is proposed.

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Impact of Reinforcement Ratio and Loading Type on the Deformation Capacity of High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composites Reinforced with Mild Steel

Journal of Structural Engineering

Matthew J Bandelt, Sarah L. Billington

2016 High-performance fiber-reinforced cement-based composites (HPFRCCs) reinforced with mild steel have been proposed for use in structural elements to enhance component strength and ductility, increase damage tolerance, and reduce reinforcement congestion. Recent research has shown that HPFRCCs have a high resistance to splitting cracks, which causes reinforcement strains to concentrate when a dominant tensile crack forms, leading to early reinforcement strain hardening and reinforcement fracture. This paper presents the impact of longitudinal reinforcement ratio, ranging from 0.54 to 2.0%, and the influence of monotonic and cyclic loading histories on the deformation capacity of reinforced HPFRCC flexural members subject to three-point and four-point bending. Experimental results show that load cycling can decrease deformation capacity of flexural members by up to 67% when compared to monotonic deformation capacity. The impact of load cycling on deformation capacity is shown to be strongly affected by changes in longitudinal reinforcement ratio. Unlike traditional reinforced concrete, deformation capacity is shown to increase under monotonic and cyclic loading by increasing the reinforcement ratio of a reinforced HPFRCC flexural element. Using observed failure modes and deformation capacities, combined with prior research results on reinforced HPFRCC components, important considerations are provided for the design of reinforced HPFRCC structural elements to ensure sufficient member deformation capacity.

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Bond behavior of steel reinforcement in high-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composite flexural members

Materials and Structures

Matthew J Bandelt, Sarah L Billington

2014 High-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composites (HPFRCCs) exhibit a pseudo strain hardening behavior in tension, and increased damage tolerance when loaded in compression. The unique properties of HPFRCC materials make them a viable material for increasing structural performance under severe loading conditions. In this paper, the bond performance of mild steel reinforcement embedded in HPFRCC beams is presented. Beam specimens with lap splices were tested in four-point bending to examine the bond strength and bond-slip behavior of steel reinforcement embedded in HPFRCC materials. Specimens made with three different HPFRCC mixtures, as well as a traditional normal weight concrete were tested in four point bending. The parameters investigated were the amount of concrete cover and the presence of steel confinement in the lap splice region. Experimental results show that HPFRCC normalized bond strengths increased by 37 %, on average, when compared to concrete. Furthermore, the bond-slip behavior of reinforcement in HPFRCCs had a higher toughness than observed for concrete specimens. Test results are compared with existing bond-slip models for fiber reinforced concrete from beam tests and HPFRCCs from pullout experiments, and a recommendation to modify the ascending branch of an existing bond-slip model applicable to ductile HPFRCCs is proposed.

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