Why is it so hard to pass laws to regulate guns in America? Let our experts explain

Why is it so hard to pass laws to regulate guns in America? Let our experts explain Why is it so hard to pass laws to regulate guns in America? Let our experts explain

August 21, 20192 min read
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So far this year in the United States, there have been eight mass shootings taking the lives of more than 60 people. It’s tragic, but the concept of taking action to remedy this problem is still seen more as political than proactive.


In fact, the possibility of being caught up in gun violence is now a part of the everyday lives of a majority of Americans.


“Today, 59% of Americans say random acts of violence, like mass shootings, pose the biggest safety threat to them, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll conducted this month after 31 people were killed in back-to-back rampages in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio. The poll also found that 78% of Americans believe another such attack will likely unfold in the next three months. So far this year, there have been more than 250 mass shootings, according to the Gun Violence Archive, a widely cited non-profit that counts incidents in which at least four people other than the shooter were injured or killed.” TIME, Aug. 13, 2019


It is almost baffling why there are bottlenecks and roadblocks to finding a solution – and there are lots of questions that need to be asked.


  • Why don’t national lawmakers pass laws regarding gun violence/mass shooting? 
  • How has public opinion changed on gun control in the last 30 years? 
  • How does gun violence in the U.S. compare to other countries? 
  • What is the current state of gun control laws in the U.S.?


If you need answers, that’s where our experts can help.


Dr. Gregg R. Murray, professor of political science at Augusta University, is available to talk about why lawmakers are having such a tough time tackling gun violence in America. Murray’s research focuses on political behavior and psychology with specific interests in voter mobilization and turnout. He is also executive director of the Association for Politics and the Life Sciences.




Connect with:
  • Gregg Murray
    Gregg Murray Professor of Political Science | Department of Social Sciences

    Dr. Gregg Murray's research focuses on political behavior and psychology with specific interests in voter mobilization and turnout.

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