The 'XX' factor: Women voters and what candidates need to know for future elections

The 'XX' factor: Women voters and what candidates need to know for future elections The 'XX' factor: Women voters and what candidates need to know for future elections

January 7, 20212 min read
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As unique as the 2020 election was, it was still similar to every other election, where winning comes down to isolating key demographics, swaying them to lend support and getting those voters out to the ballot box.


There are many different blocks of voters in America based on income, education, race, geography and gender. Gender among them is key, and on Nov. 3, women ensured their votes were counted.


Ask Virginia voter Mary Hayes why Joe Biden defeated Donald Trump, and she does not hesitate.


“Women won this election!” says Hayes, 56, a mother of three and Biden supporter from Leesburg, Virginia. In particular, she credits two categories of voters that she herself is part of: Black women and suburban women. Trump had begged the latter group — some of whom he’d alienated by referring to them as “housewives” — to “please, please” like him. But that plea rang hollow, she says.


“We showed America that suburban women are diverse, and are a beautiful collection of ethnicity, race, marital status, occupations and many other categories,” Hayes says. “Suburban women mobilized, determined to remove Trump from office.” And, she says, they succeeded. Nov. 16, Associated Press



Women did play a key role in the vote as it rolled across the country. But now, the balance of power in Washington will rely on two key Senate races in Georgia. And no doubt, both sides are strongly courting female voters.


If you are a journalist looking to know how important a role gender will play in the January runoffs and what all four of the candidates need to do to secure those votes, then let an expert from Augusta University help with your story.


Dr. Mary-Kate Lizotte is an expert in political behavior and the implications of gender differences in public opinion. She is available to talk about the 2020 election and the upcoming Senate runoffs in Georgia. Click on her name to schedule an interview.



Connect with:
  • Mary-Kate  Lizotte
    Mary-Kate Lizotte Associate Professor of Political Science

    Lizotte is an expert in public opinion and can share insight on the role the COVID-19 pandemic plays in the 2020 presidential election.

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