Black Maternal Health Week – Infant mortality in Georgia is still high, what can be done to save more lives?

Black Maternal Health Week – Infant mortality in Georgia is still high, what can be done to save more lives? Black Maternal Health Week – Infant mortality in Georgia is still high, what can be done to save more lives?

April 14, 20212 min read
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Earlier this week, President Joe Biden proclaimed that April 11 thru 17 would be Black Maternal Health Week in America.




In Georgia, the state has consistently been ranked as one of the most dangerous places in this country to be a new mother.


Approximately 26 Georgia women die from pregnancy complications for every 100,000 live births, compared to the national average of about 17 women. But even more devastating is the fact that about 60% of the state’s maternal deaths between 2012 and 2016 were found to be preventable, according to the Georgia Department of Public Health.


And the mortality rates are much more tragic for Black women in Georgia. African American women are almost three times more likely to die from a pregnancy-related cause than white women in Georgia. Black mothers in rural areas of Georgia are at an even higher risk.


“Maternal and infant mortality are really significant indicators of the quality of health in any area, so my colleagues around Georgia really felt challenged to do something that we hadn’t done in a long time in our state, which was to get the data,” says Dr. Chad Ray. “Because you can’t really fix something unless you know who and why. And then you assemble the stakeholders to formulate a plan to make a dent and to move the needle on something that is just so important.”


This is an important topic that impacts mothers in Georgia and across the entire United States. And if you are a journalist looking to cover this topic – then let us help.



Dr. Chad Ray is the Interim Section Chief of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Augusta University Medical Center. He is an expert in the areas of maternal mortality & global women's health initiatives. Dr. Ray is available to speak with media about Black Maternal Health Week - simply click on his icon now to arrange an interview today.



Connect with:
  • Chad Ray
    Chad Ray Interim Section Chief, Associate Professor

    His interests include maternal mortality & global women's health initiatives. He also provides insight into COVID-19's impact on pregnancy.

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