Covering the rising tensions between Russia and the West? Let our expert help with your questions and coverage

Covering the rising tensions between Russia and the West? Let our expert help with your questions and coverage Covering the rising tensions between Russia and the West? Let our expert help with your questions and coverage

February 14, 20223 min read
Featuring:

Troops are amassing along both sides of the border separating Russia and Ukraine. Diplomatic efforts from leaders from across Europe are in high gear as the concerns of an invasion and potentially all-out war between Russia and Ukraine could send the region into chaos.


As the world watches and both sides gather allies for support, there are a lot of questions to ask, history to explore and explanations needed about what’s going on now and why.


Dr. Craig Albert, associate professor of political science and director of the Master of Arts in Intelligence and Security Studies at program at Augusta University, sat down with ABC News to answer some of those lingering questions.



Q: What is the reason for Russia’s interest in Ukraine?


"If NATO allows Ukraine to become a member of NATO, which is what Putin is fearing here, he might think that they might want to go to Belarus next.
Where else are they going to go? Georgia, the Republic of Georgia? Putin does not want NATO literally bordering the Russian federation. He thinks that’s a threat and would allow NATO to put missiles and missile defense in those countries, which as you know, is much more of a direct threat to Russia."


Q: Maybe it comes down to the possibility of military threats. Why does the US care what’s happening way over there?


"So, when you have any type of European possible land mass war, conventional war, that’s going to be a cataclysmic problem for the world. I think of the untold numbers of dead that would happen in some type of land conventional war, kinetic operations on Europe.

The last time we had something like that was the wars in the former Republic of Yugoslavia in the early ’90s. That resulted in up to 300,000 to 400,000 dead in two or three years.

So, we live in a globalized world, so if you have Eastern or Central Europe that gets confronted with a massive conventional war, that’s going to effect the security and the economy of the entire world including us."


Q: So, is it just the US being world police again?


"Each side is viewing the other as acting aggressively and I think both sides are just trying to sure up their defenses, just trying to make sure that they can handle the current situation. The United States is entering in what’s called a status quo power cycle, where the United States just wants the power of the international arena to stay where it is.”



With news reports of an invasion potentially happening soon, there will be an enormous amount of coverage on this topic – and that’s where the experts from Augusta can help with your stories.



Dr. Craig Albert is director of the Master of Arts in Intelligence and Security Studies at Augusta University. He is a leading expert on war, terrorism, and American politics. This is an important national and international issue. Albert is available to speak with media – simply click on his name to arrange an interview today.




Connect with:
  • Craig Albert
    Craig Albert Director of the Master of Arts in Intelligence and Security Studies

    Dr. Craig Albert focuses on national security, cyberconflict, ethnic conflict, and political thought.

powered by Powered By

You might also like...