Senior lecturer at Aston University appointed as a Champion of the Microbiology Society

Senior lecturer at Aston University appointed as a Champion of the Microbiology Society Senior lecturer at Aston University appointed as a Champion of the Microbiology Society

February 14, 20222 min read
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Dr Jonathan Cox, a senior lecturer in microbiology at Aston University, has been made a Champion of the Microbiology Society for the Midlands area, U.K.



Microbiology Society Champions are members who help to raise the Society’s profile in their local area by initiating activities and events of their own or participating in Society-led events. They are appointed because of their passion for their subject matter and an enthusiasm to communicate it widely.


Jonathan’s research interests surround the discovery of new antibiotics. He leads the Mycobacterial Research Group at Aston University, a multidisciplinary team spanning microbiology, biochemistry, molecular genetics, structural biology and drug discovery. The team’s main focus is to study the physiology of various pathogenic mycobacteria and to discover new ways to treat infections.


He also teaches at Aston University and currently leads the teaching for first year microbiology on courses in biomedical science, biology and biochemistry,


Jonathan also regularly engages with the press to comment on news stories and issues related to microbiology, infectious diseases and antibiotic resistance.


He has been a full member of the Microbiology Society for 10 years and has already contributed in many ways, including hosting the Microbiology Society Roadshow at Aston University in 2021. He has also been featured in Microbiology Today discussing his research.


Speaking of his appointment, Jonathan said:


“Anti-microbial resistance (AMR) accounts for around 700,000 deaths per annum globally and that number is predicted to rise to 10 million by 2050. The current economic burden of AMR is estimated to be at least €1.5 billion per year in the EU. New antibiotics and an improved understanding of how to use them will help to slow the progression of AMR, saving countless lives in the future.


“I am delighted to have been appointed as a Microbiology Society Champion and to use this opportunity to raise the profile of the Society and, in particular, the importance of research into AMR.”


Connect with:
  • Dr Jonathan A. G. Cox
    Dr Jonathan A. G. Cox Lecturer in Microbiology

    Dr Cox's research interests surround the discovery of new antibiotics & identifying the mechanisms by which those antibiotics kill bacteria.

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