Is a reckoning coming to Washington's once most invincible politicians?

Oct 30, 2020

1 min

Rosalyn CoopermanStephen Farnsworth


With all eyes on next Tuesday, America could be seeing a serious change in the make-up of the Senate and House of Representatives. With a divided country and an electorate on edge and looking for change, the usual gift of incumbency and re-election is now a far from guaranteed blessing for those Washington veterans for whom re-election is usually a given.


According to NBC, there are more than a handful of high-profile and once thought to be invincible politicians on the ropes.



But can popular politicians sustain the thirst for change when voters cast their ballots? Susan Collins, John Cornyn, Lindsey Graham and even Mitch McConnell may be looking for work in 2021.


It’s a fascinating angle to what has been a truly unique time in American politics. And if you are a journalist covering the election and the balance of power in Congress, then let our experts help.





Dr. Stephen Farnsworth is a sought-after political commentator on subjects ranging from presidential politics to the local Virginia congressional races. He has been widely featured in national media, including The Washington Post, Reuters, The Chicago Tribune and MSNBC.


Dr. Rosalyn Cooperman, associate professor of political science at the University of Mary Washington and member of Gender Watch 2018, is an expert on women in politics.


Both experts are available to speak to media – simply click on either icon to arrange an interview.


Connect with:
Rosalyn Cooperman

Rosalyn Cooperman

Professor of Political Science

Dr. Cooperman's expertise focuses on women in politics.

Women and PoliticsAmerican PoliticsCongress
Stephen Farnsworth

Stephen Farnsworth

Professor of Political Science and International Affairs

Dr. Farnsworth has spent decades researching how media and politics intersect. Check out his website at stephenfarnsworth.net.

JournalismAmerican ElectionsAmerican GovernmentThe American PresidencyInternet Politics

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