Using biosensors to detect disease, pain, pollution and weapons

Using biosensors to detect disease, pain, pollution and weapons Using biosensors to detect disease, pain, pollution and weapons

May 31, 20221 min read
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Air pollution, chemical weapons, diseases, drugs and signs of life on other planets — all can be detected with biosensors.


The development of high tech to do this job — when canines or conventional tests aren’t practical — is a field that spurred NJIT’s Omowunmi Sadik into action.


Case in point: Sadik created a sensor that detects the novel coronavirus using the power of a smartphone — "So simple it can be 3D-printed by undergraduates," she explained — and there are even biosensors that can measure pain. The latter are especially useful for those who can't accurately communicate due to age or health.


Sadik, a distinguished professor of chemistry and environmental science, leads NJIT's BioSMART Center and is a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, Royal Society of Chemistry and African Academy of Sciences.


To interview her, simply click on the button below.





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  • Omowunmi
    Omowunmi "Wunmi" Sadik Distinguished Professor

    Omowunmi Sadik applies her knowledge of surface chemistry, chemical and biological sensors in healthcare, food safety and the environment.

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